Writers' Classes

    • Wednesday, April 24, 2019
    • Wednesday, May 29, 2019
    • 6 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR042419JG
    • 3
    Register

    Whether you've never written, written much, are a published writer or somewhere in between, no matter what you might be thinking about or actually be writing (any genre), whether you're writing for yourself, your family or with plans to publish, this six week series will generate new writing, new energy, be fun, and may even surprise you. 

    It's an opportunity to learn more about your strengths as a writer and to learn craft elements. As an Amherst Writers & Artists (AWA) Affiliate, using the practices outlined in Pat Schneider's book Writing Alone and With Others, Julie Gardner creates a safe space for people to express and take risks with their writing. Usually two to three prompts are suggested (optional) followed by a time for reading and responses (optional). Since each writing is a first draft, like "a new baby" says Pat Schneider, responses can only start with: what I liked, what was strong, what stays with me. No criticisms or suggestions are allowed. Come try it and see your writing and confidence expand.

    Instructor Bio:

    Julie Gardner has masters degrees in counseling and human development & the family and a bachelors in early childhood education. She is well published in those fields and has been a national adult educator of early childhood professionals. After a move to Seattle 11 years ago, she took many classes at Richard Hugo House, received a literary fiction certificate from University of Washington and became an AWA Affiliate. For nearly nine years she has led retreats and weekly WritersGathering groups in Seattle including one at Mary's Place, a day shelter for women experiencing homelessness which resulted in an anthology edited by Julie. Four years ago she became a nationally certified Life-Legacies facilitator and has led individuals and groups in legacy/ethical will writing.



    • Thursday, April 25, 2019
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR042519STB+
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    You’ll get an overview of general aspects of law enforcement and it’s a great opportunity to ask questions that will shape an upcoming class on police practices for writers. 

    If you’re contemplating or writing a mystery, crime thriller, or other stories that involve a police presence, this is an excellent way to begin.  Sandra Terhune-Bickler and Steven Bickler bring a combined 51 years of police experience to this Roundtable so don’t miss it!

    Bios:

    Sandra Terhune-Bickler served with the Santa Monica Police Department for 28 years before retiring in September of 2014. Her last assignment with SMPD was Sergeant-In-Charge of the Resource Development Unit – Personnel and Training. Additionally, during her tenure with the SMPD, Dr. Terhune-Bickler was a member of the Crisis Negotiations Team both as a police officer and a sergeant for over 20 years. She was also a Motorcycle Traffic Enforcement Officer for six years. She also implemented and coordinated the SMPD’s Peer Support Program. She has a Master of Science degree in Counseling Psychology, and a Doctorate degree in Human and Organizational Systems. Dr. Terhune-Bickler frequently teaches law enforcement personnel on topics related to crisis negotiations and tactical communication strategies. Her article, “Too Close for Comfort: Negotiating with Fellow Officers” was published in FBI’s Law Enforcement Journal (2004). She recently presented at the Washington State Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Conference, and Kitsap County 40-hr law enforcement CIT Course. She resides on Bainbridge Island with her husband, Steve.

     

    Steven Bickler served with the Santa Monica Police Department for 23 years before retiring in September of 2014. He was a Field Training Officer, responsible for the training and evaluation of new officers on police field procedures including tactics, report writing and the law. He was assigned to the 3rd St Bicycle detail responsible for directed patrol of the downtown business district, engaging in community-oriented and neighborhood-centered policing and problem solving. He was Vice Chair of the Santa Monica Police Officer’s Association for approximately six years. He received a Life Saving Chief’s Commendation in 1997 for preventing a woman’s suicide. Additionally, he worked in the Chief’s office on crime analysis data integrity, and compliance with the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR). He and his wife, Sandy, now reside on Bainbridge Island, where he engages in “bite-sized” dessert baking, and fine art photography.



    • Saturday, April 27, 2019
    • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
    • BARN Great Room, Class Code: WR042719JA
    • 77
    Register

    Just as a cup of tea can settle and soothe us, the right poem at the right time can be a powerful sustaining remedy.

    Poet and performer Judith Adams explores poetry’s restorative powers by reciting and exploring poems that help us understand grief, fear, sadness, loss, and much more.  By sharing her love of poetry, Adams encourages audiences to share poems that have deeply touched their lives and discusses how writing poetry can be a potent medicine for us all.

    Judith Adams is an English-born poet who has lived in the United States since 1976.  Adams has published four books of poetry, conducted poetry workshops, recorded several albums of her work, and published her poems in magazines and anthologies.  Adams has held reading at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, the Frye Art Museum, and Third Place Books.  Adams lives on Whidbey Island.

    This inspirational talk is co-sponsored by the Writers Studio at BARN and Bloedel Reserve. We hope you can join us!

    About Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau: Speakers Bureau is one Humanities Washington’s oldest and most popular programs. A roster of 31 cultural experts and scholars provides low-cost, high-quality public presentations across the state, encouraging audiences to think, learn and engage in conversation. These diverse and engaging speakers cover a variety of topics, including popular culture, photography, architecture, literature, food, film and history. Best of all – these presentations are free and open to the public. For more about Speakers Bureau, visit www.humanities.org/programs/speakers




    • Sunday, April 28, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR042819LD
    • 9
    Register

    Pulitzer Prize-winning Neruda wrote odes to socks and artichokes. William Carlos Williams penned the infamous “The Red Wheelbarrow,” regarding not much more than a wheelbarrow and some chickens. Can we make our everyday lives into poems that surprise and delight? Can we celebrate the ordinary, allowing the small particulars we encounter infiltrate our poems? In this workshop, we will explore poets who have done just this. We will use their works as prompts to create our own songs of praise for the mundane details of our lives.

    Details:
    This is a beginner level class.

    Instructor: 
    Lauren Davis is the author of the chapbook Each Wild Thing’s Consent (Poetry Wolf Press). She holds an MFA from the Bennington Writing Seminars, and her poetry and essays can be found in publications such as Prairie SchoonerSpillwayEmpty Mirror, and Lunch Ticket. Davis teaches at The Writers’ Workshoppe in Port Townsend, WA, and she works as an editor at The Tishman Review.



    Posted 11-29/M6/tt

    • Saturday, May 04, 2019
    • Saturday, May 11, 2019
    • 2 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR050419AG
    • 7
    Register

    The publishing world has changed dramatically with the eruption of the digital economy and social media networks. In today’s world, publishers and agents demand not only high-quality content but a digital presence for authors in order to publish their creation.

    In this two-session Saturday class, Antonio Garcia will introduce the basic concepts of digital marketing and social media marketing to build an online presence for writers. The classes will cover the differences between a website and a blog, basic concepts of SEO (search engine optimization), social media strategy and content marketing. 

    Bring your laptop, smartphone and notepad and start or continue growing your digital presence to get website traffic, followers and likes and to increase your chances of grabbing the attention of publishers and agents.

    InstructorAntonio Garcia is a brand strategist and art director who started his career in advertising and marketing 15 years ago in Madrid (Spain). Since then he has worked in London (United Kingdom), Portland and now the Greater Seattle Area. He has worked for advertising agencies, start-ups, non-profit organizations, educational institutions and as a freelance consultant.


    • Saturday, May 18, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR051819JH
    • 8
    Register

    Starting your first novel is an act of courage, and starting your sixth isn’t much easier. Jennifer Haigh is the author five novels, each of which nearly killed her.  She is also the author of three unfinished and unfinishable manuscripts that will never see the light of day. In this session she’ll discuss what worked and what didn’t. Topics will include:

    • How to set up your writing life
    • How to tell the difference between a novel and a short story
    • The most important choice a novelist makes
    • Plot vs. causality
    • Reading while you write
    • The mistake everyone makes
    • When to give up, and how to survive it
    • Why the second novel is hardest
    • What to do on days when nothing comes

    The class will offer a mix of craft lecture and in-class writing. Bring an idea for a novel, a laptop or notebook and all your questions about novel-craft. Whether you have a brand-new idea for a novel or have been working on one for years, you can expect to leave with concrete strategies to move your project forward. 

    Instructor bio:

    Jennifer Haigh is a novelist and short story writer. Her most recent book, the novel HEAT AND LIGHT, won a Literature Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and was named a Best Book of 2016 by The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and NPR. Her previous books include FAITH, THE CONDITION, BAKER TOWERS and MRS. KIMBLE, winner of the PEN/Hemingway Award for debut fiction, and the short story collection NEWS FROM HEAVEN, winner of the Massachusetts Book Award and the PEN New England Award in Fiction. Her short stories have been published in Granta, Electric Literature, The Best American Short Stories and many other places. A native of western Pennsylvania and a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, she is a 2018 Guggenheim Fellow.


    • Thursday, May 23, 2019
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR052319MS
    • 8
    Register

    "BARN  Gathering” --Authors’ Reading--In Lieu of Roundtable

    In the spirit of Gertrude Stein, BARN Writers and Martha Salinas will be hosting a salon for members and non-members to read their work to an appreciative audience. This is a great opportunity to prepare for your debut as an author. Even if you’ve read at your own book signings before, this is a wonderful chance to reach new readers. Beginners and experienced writers alike are welcome. 

    There will be room for ten readers and two guests who don’t read. Each reading will be five minutes with two short breaks. Please sign up early. 



    • Monday, May 27, 2019
    • 12:30 AM - 11:30 PM

    Memorial Day Holiday

    • Wednesday, May 29, 2019
    • 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR052919JB
    • 10
    Register

    This workshop is all about helping students learn and understanding the fundamentals of story structure as exemplified in several film classics (titles TBD, but stuff everyone will have seen or be familiar with). This workshop will break down story structure into a four-act sequence of readily identifiable, quantifiable steps stories progress through. We will uncover the essential qualities of each step and how they relate to the step’s overall story function, and we will examine how these steps intertwine with character arcs to create meaningful, powerful, satisfying conclusions. In-class exercises will be directed towards analysis and refinement of student WIPs.  

    Instructor:
    Jason Black
     is a Seattle-area developmental editor who has helped scores of writers find the best in their work over the past nine years. Jason teaches writing, story structure, and character development classes through the Pacific Northwest Writers Association. He is a regular speaker at the PNWA Writers’ Conference and a member of the Northwest Independent Editors Guild’s speakers’ bureau. In addition to his blog, Jason’s articles on writing craft have been featured in PNWA’s Author magazine and the literary journal Line Zero. Jason edits for novelists in all genres, though his own novels, Bread for the Pharaoh, Pebblehoof, and Blackpelt are all middle-grade fiction. Find Jason online at PlotToPunctuation.com, or on Twitter as @p2p_editor.




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    • Saturday, June 01, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
    • BARN GREAT ROOM, Class Code: WR060119DM
    • 47
    Register

    The emotional effect of fiction on readers is a craft.  Based on psychological research and study of what makes novels emotionally gripping, this intensive workshop takes participants beyond showing or telling to create an emotional journey for readers—one unseen but nevertheless deeply felt and ultimately unforgettable.  

    While writers might disagree over showing versus telling or plotting versus pantsing, none would argue this: if you want to write strong fiction, you must make your readers feel. The reader's experience must be an emotional journey of its own, one as involving as your characters' struggles, discoveries, and triumphs are for you.

    That's where The Emotional Craft of Fiction comes in. In his book, veteran literary agent and expert fiction instructor Donald Maass shows you how to use story to provoke a visceral and emotional experience in readers. Topics covered include:

    • emotional modes of writing
    • beyond showing versus telling
    • your story's emotional world
    • moral stakes
    • connecting the inner and outer journeys
    • plot as emotional opportunities
    • invoking higher emotions, symbols, and emotional language
    • cascading change
    • story as emotional mirror
    • positive spirit and magnanimous writing
    • the hidden current that makes stories move

    This is an intensive, hands-on workshop for fiction writers.  Participants should bring a WIP and writing materials.

    Presenter bio: A literary agent in New York, Donald Maass’s agency sells more than 150 novels every year to major publishers in the U.S. and overseas.  He is the author of The Career Novelist (1996), Writing the Breakout Novel (2001), Writing the Breakout Novel Workbook(2004) and The Fire in Fiction (2009), Writing 21stCentury Fiction (2012) and The Emotional Craft of Fiction (2016).  He is a past president of the Association of Authors’ Representatives, Inc.

    • Saturday, June 22, 2019
    • 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR062219BJ
    • 10
    Register

    This workshop takes an unbiased and unvarnished look at a modern writer’s publishing options, from “Big 5” traditional publishers to small presses to self publishing (with or without the support of service companies) to “hybrid” and other emerging models. Taught by a publishing professional who works on and appreciates both sides of the fence, this class gets past the hype and examines pros and cons of each choice, realistic costs and income potential, as well as scams and pitfalls to avoid. Most importantly, it helps writers seeking publication understand their own goals, strengths, and how to make a decision that's best for them.

    Attendees will…

    1. Be able to identify the broad range of choices available for publishing: big presses, small presses, independent self publishing, subsidy and “author assisted” presses, and emerging models. 
    2. Gain a realistic impression of the costs, timing, and logistics involved in producing a book. 
    3. Have clear guidelines (a checklist of questions) to help them consider the best options for their specific situation.

    Instructor: 
    Beth Jusino is a publishing consultant for both traditional and self-publishing authors, with almost twenty years of experience helping writers navigate the complicated space between manuscript and final book. A former literary agent and marketing director, she’s the author of the award-winning The Author's Guide to Marketing and has ghostwritten or collaborated on half a dozen additional titles. Beth is a member of the Northwest Independent Editors Guild, a regular speaker for Seattle Public Library’s #SeattleWrites workshops, and has taught at writers’ conferences across the country. Visit her online at www.bethjusino.com or on Twitter @bethjusino. 



    Posted 8-18-18/tt/min6

    • Saturday, July 13, 2019
    • 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR071319STB+
    • 11
    Register

    This team-taught, interactive course offers a comprehensive introduction to general aspects of law enforcement for writers to enhance their understanding and portrayal of police practices in their writing


    Instructors:

    Sandra Terhune-Bickler served with the Santa Monica Police Department for 28 years before retiring in September of 2014. Her last assignment with SMPD was Sergeant-In-Charge of the Resource Development Unit – Personnel and Training. Additionally, during her tenure with the SMPD, Dr. Terhune-Bickler was a member of the Crisis Negotiations Team both as a police officer and a sergeant for over 20 years. She was also a Motorcycle Traffic Enforcement Officer for six years. She also implemented and coordinated the SMPD’s Peer Support Program. She has a Master of Science degree in Counseling Psychology, and a Doctorate degree in Human and Organizational Systems. Dr. Terhune-Bickler frequently teaches law enforcement personnel on topics related to crisis negotiations and tactical communication strategies. Her article, “Too Close for Comfort: Negotiating with Fellow Officers” was published in FBI’s Law Enforcement Journal (2004). She recently presented at the Washington State Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Conference, and Kitsap County 40-hr law enforcement CIT Course. She resides on Bainbridge Island with her husband, Steve.

     

    Steven Bickler served with the Santa Monica Police Department for 23 years before retiring in September of 2014. He was a Field Training Officer, responsible for the training and evaluation of new officers on police field procedures including tactics, report writing and the law. He was assigned to the 3rd St Bicycle detail responsible for directed patrol of the downtown business district, engaging in community-oriented and neighborhood-centered policing and problem solving. He was Vice Chair of the Santa Monica Police Officer’s Association for approximately six years. He received a Life Saving Chief’s Commendation in 1997 for preventing a woman’s suicide. Additionally, he worked in the Chief’s office on crime analysis data integrity, and compliance with the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR). He and his wife, Sandy, now reside on Bainbridge Island, where he engages in “bite-sized” dessert baking, and fine art photography.



    • Thursday, August 01, 2019
    • 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR050119JB
    • 5
    Register

    Have you wanted to write a story but felt overwhelmed by the magnum opus of a novel? Have you tried writing a short story but 20+ pages still felt untenable? This class is for you! A short-short story (flash fiction) has two requirements, says author Fred Chappell: “that it be quite short and that it be troubling.” In this generative class, we’ll review the elements of craft employed by fiction writers (with a nod to the craft of poetry) and we’ll read and discuss examples of flash fiction from anthologies such as Sudden Fiction and Flash Fiction. We’ll compose our own flash stories by responding to some in-class writing exercises, which are designed to help you write succinctly while suspending disbelief.


    Janee J. Baugher is the author of Coördinates of Yes (Ahadada Books) and The Body’s Physics (Tebot Bach), and she holds an MFA from Eastern Washington University. Her creative writing has been published in over 100 literary journals, including Tin House, The Southern Review, The American Journal of Poetry, Nimrod International Journal of Prose and PoetryBoulevardNano Fiction, and The Writer’s Chronicle. Since 1999 Baugher has taught creative writing in primary and secondary schools, at arts camps and libraries, and at colleges and universities. Additionally, she’s held editorial positions at several journals, including Willow SpringsSwitched-on Gutenberg, and StringTown, and she’s currently a poetry reader for Boulevardhttp://JaneeJBaugher.wordpress.com







    • Wednesday, September 18, 2019
    • Wednesday, October 23, 2019
    • 6 sessions
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code: WR091819KA
    • 11
    Register

    This six-week course will focus on shaping research, family stories, and other source materials into a form that will appeal to a contemporary reader. We will focus on the emotional development of your characters, as well as setting, scene, and dialogue, to bring fresh language to situations and characters. Sensory detail draws the reader into the story, but we must also empathize with the characters and fully inhabit their worlds. One of the most successful genres in both commercial and literary publishing today, readers of all ages find a well-imagined historical novel irresistible.

    We will end by discussing how to approach an agent or editor, cover letters, the synopsis, and possible markets. 

    Instructor: Kathleen Alcalá’s trilogy on nineteenth century Mexico was published by Chronicle Books: Spirits of the Ordinary, The Flower in the Skull, and Treasures in Heaven. Her work has received the Western States Book Award, the Governor's Writers Award, a Pacific Northwest Bookseller's Award, and a Washington State Book Award. A co-founder and contributing editor to The Raven Chronicles, Kathleen has been a writer in residence at Richard Hugo House and was permanent faculty in the Northwest Institute of Literary Arts MFA Program on Whidbey Island. Kathleen is also the author of a short story collection, Mrs. Vargas and the Dead NaturalistThe Desert Remembers My Name, essays on family and writing, and most recently, The Deepest Roots: Finding Food and Community on a Pacific Northwest Island from the University of Washington Press.

    • Saturday, September 28, 2019
    • 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR
    • 12
    Register

    Nike’s “Just Do It” tagline was part of a 10-year campaign that increased the company’s share of the North American sport-shoe business by 35%. The takeaway? Good copy is a powerful thing.

    This class will walk you through the basics of persuasive writing for advertising and marketing, applicable to any medium (print, digital, social, etc.). Learn whether copywriting should be transactional, transformational — or both. Do a quick writing exercise and get a chance to workshop your writing with the group.

    Perfect for: authors and writers looking to self-promote or broaden skill sets, small business owners or entrepreneurs, and budding writers interested in copywriting as a way to generate income.

     

    Emily McCaffrey is a copywriter with Actualize Marketing and the owner of Your Almost Favorite. She specializes in B2B and technology industries, with clients such as Insight, Datalink, and Comcast Technology Solutions, as well as growing businesses and startups. Emily has an MBA in Finance from Pepperdine University and a BA in Songwriting from Berklee College of Music. She currently resides on Bainbridge Island with her fiancé and feisty pit bull.


    • Saturday, October 19, 2019
    • Sunday, October 20, 2019
    • 2 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR101919EB
    • 12
    Register

    For those who have always wanted to write a memoir, but just haven't gotten pen to paper (or need a little motivation to keep going).  A 2-day workshop that offers multiple short lessons and writing prompts to help you delve into issues such as finding your subject, voice, and perspective; creating dynamic characters and scenes; shaping a story; and crafting language. 


    “That weekend is used as a starting point, a pin in my personal map, as I’ve made my journey toward creativity.  Plus, it was a whole lot of fun!” — comment from a student.


    Erica Bauermeister is the bestselling author of four novels, including The School of Essential Ingredients and The Scent Keeper, as well as the upcoming memoir, House Lessons.  She has a PhD in literature from the U.W. and has taught there and Antioch University, as well as in workshops at Hedgebrook, Write on the Sound, and the Chuckanut Writers Conference, among others.  She currently lives in Port Townsend.



    • Wednesday, October 30, 2019
    • Wednesday, November 20, 2019
    • 4 sessions
    • Writers' Room, BARN, WR103019WR
    • 12
    Register

    It’s time to take your writing seriously. Warren Read—writer, educator, and published author—will guide you through every step of writing a short story in this four-session workshop. 

    The class will cover what makes a short story, character development, setting, dialogue, and point of view. Each session will include writing advice, fluency prompts, sharing your work with class members, and writing groups/workshopping. Between meetings, you will focus on developing your short story.

    All levels of writers are welcome. You might dust off an old story you began years ago, come to class with an idea for a story, or attend the first session with no clue what you want to write. It’s all okay because the first class will begin with brainstorming activities. You’ll leave with a clear direction in mind.

    Warren Read will use excerpts and ideas from Ron Carlson Writes a Story. You are encouraged to get a copy from the library, Amazon, Kindle, iBooks, and others.     

    Instructor Bio: Warren Read is the author of a memoir, The Lyncher in Me (2009, Borealis Books) and the novel, Ash Falls (2017, Ig Publishing). His fiction has appeared in Hot Metal Bridge, Mud Season Review, Sliver of Stone, Inklette, Switchback Magazine and the Christmas issue of East Bay Review. He is an assistant principal in Bainbridge Island, WA; in 2015 he received his MFA in from the Rainier Writing Workshop at Pacific Lutheran University. Learn more about Warren at www.warren-read.com.


    • Saturday, November 02, 2019
    • Saturday, November 16, 2019
    • 2 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR110219MB
    • 12
    Register

    So you want to write a novel? Or you’ve written 40,000 words of a novel, and suddenly find yourself stuck. Or your stories are interesting but lack a real plot.

    Michele Bacon is here to help. Over the course of two Saturdays, she’ll put you to work on developing a compelling protagonist, raising the stakes, and plotting your manuscript. Come with a full story idea or with only a desire to write a novel. You’ll leave with clear direction and a plot waiting to become a manuscript.

    The two sessions will include brief lectures, hands-on workshops, one-on-one discussion with Michele, and some partner work with other students.

    Please feel free to bring a lunch. BARN has a refrigerator to store your lunch in.

    Instructor

    Michele Bacon is the author of contemporary young adult novels Antipodes and Life Before.  Her work focuses on families, friends, and the complicated relationships therein. When she’s not writing, Michele loves skiing, playing tabletop games, traveling, and dreaming of travel. She’s visited all 50 states and dozens of countries, always eager to hear people’s stories and immerse herself in other cultures. Wherever she goes, Michele enjoys helping writers find their voices and tell their stories. And she loves coming home to Seattle, where she lives with her partner and three young children.



    • Sunday, November 03, 2019
    • Sunday, November 24, 2019
    • 4 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR110319PL
    • 6
    Register

    Great writers vary the structure of their sentences, using particular forms to intensify meaning and deepen emotion. This hands-on course in developing virtuoso skill in sentencing and paragraphing is designed for writers interested in revising several short works or a book-in-progress. We’ll scrutinize brilliant sentences and paragraphs and deepen our craft by writing our own.

    Bring a notebook to write in and the required text: The Writer’s Portable Mentor, 2nd edition (available at Eagle Harbor Book Company).


    Priscilla Long is a writer of poetry, essays, creative nonfictions, fictions, science, and history. She has an MFA degree from the University of Washington and teaches writing.

    Priscilla is the author of:

    The Writer’s Portable Mentor: A Guide to Art, Craft, and the Writing Life, 2nd edition

    Minding the Muse: A Handbook for Painters, Composers, Writers, and Other Creators

    Crossing Over: Poems

    Fire and Stone: Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?

    Where the Sun Never Shines: A History of America’s Bloody Coal Industry

    Her awards include a National Magazine Award.


    • Thursday, November 21, 2019
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR112119MS
    • 12
    Register

    "BARN  Gathering” --Authors’ Reading--In Lieu of Roundtable

    In the spirit of Gertrude Stein, BARN Writers and Martha Salinas will be hosting a salon for members and non-members to read their work to an appreciative audience. This is a great opportunity to prepare for your debut as an author. Even if you’ve read at your own book signings before, this is a wonderful chance to reach new readers. Beginners and experienced writers alike are welcome. 

    There will be room for ten readers and two guests who don’t read. Each reading will be five minutes with two short breaks. Please sign up early. 



    • Saturday, November 23, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • BARN Wide - All Studios and All Floors

    BARN Bazaar begins for public at 10 am to 3:00 pm 

    More information to be posted in October.

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