Writers' Classes

    • Thursday, September 27, 2018
    • Thursday, December 27, 2018
    • 14 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR082118AR+
    • 8
    Register

    Word Sprint is a weekly time to write in the company of others. We write for twenty-five minutes, take a break, repeat. We'll turn dedicated, focused time into two of the most productive hours of our week! 

    There will be no sharing or critique, only fast-paced, supportive productivity in the company of other writers. It will be fun, exciting, and might be the thing to help you finish (or start...) your manuscript. 

    This group is free for members and only $10 for non-members from September through December.

    Organizer: Genevieve Douglass Persen is a composer and writer.




    • Saturday, October 06, 2018
    • Saturday, October 20, 2018
    • 3 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR092918PL
    • 0

    In the world of creative nonfiction, forms such as the abecedarian are proliferating. In this four-session class we will scrutinize models of three different forms (abecedarian, the A/B form, and the collage) and generate three new creative nonfictions of our own based upon these forms. In class we'll write in our notebooks in the timed writing method developed by Natalie Goldberg. As we develop our pieces, we'll work on prose style—sound and syntax—toward bringing them into the realm of highly publishable. The required text is the Second Edition of The Writers Portable Mentor: A Guide to Art, Craft, and the Writing Life (available in September 2018).

    Instructor: Priscilla Long is a Seattle-based writer of poetry, creative nonfiction, science, fiction, and history, and is a long-time independent teacher of writing. Her work appears widely and her books are Fire and Stone: Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? (University of Georgia Press), Minding the Muse: A Handbook for Painters, Poets, and Other Creators (Coffeetown Press), and Crossing Over: Poems (University of New Mexico Press). Her how-to-write guide is The Writer's Portable Mentor: A Guide to Art, Craft, and the Writing Life . She is also author of Where the Sun Never Shines: A History of America's Bloody Coal Industry. Her awards include a National Magazine Award. Her science column, Science Frictions, ran for 92 weeks in The American Scholar. She earned an MFA from the University of Washington and serves as Founding and Consulting Editor of www.historylink.org, the online encyclopedia of Washington state history. She grew up on a dairy farm on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.


    • Tuesday, October 09, 2018
    • Wednesday, October 31, 2018
    • Writers' Studio, Upper Floor, left at the front door, and 3rd door on the left.


    The Welcome to the BARN Writers' Studio is designed for members. Before attending one of these sessions, be sure you are a BARN member and have obtained your fob for entry into BARN.

    Then, at this orientation session with Amelia Ramsey, she will give you the information you need to have fob access into the Writers' Studio. Please contact Amelia by clicking here to set up a time convenient for both of you to meet.

    • Thursday, October 11, 2018
    • Thursday, January 10, 2019
    • 4 sessions
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code--WR091318JH+
    • 4
    Register

    Good fiction, good discussion, good people! The BARN Book Group 4 Writers meets monthly, the second Thursday of the month, from 6:30 – 8 PM in the Writers Studio. Join us on October 11 to discuss All the Light We Cannot Seeby Anthony Doerr. Here are titles we’re looking forward to reading:

    A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles  

    Runaway by Alice Munro (collection of short stories)

    Amsterdam by Ian McEwan 

    Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders 

    For more info, email Jenn Hager at jhager.editor@gmail.com  Members and non-members welcome! Be sure to register.

    This group is free to members and for non-members only $10 for all sessions from October 2018 through January 2019. 

    • Tuesday, October 16, 2018
    • Tuesday, December 18, 2018
    • 10 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR082118AR+
    • 2
    Register

    Word War is a weekly sprint writing meet-up, where participants will be timed for four twenty-five minute intervals, writing as many words as they can for as long as the timer is running, with short breaks in between. Word counts will be recorded, and we'll turn dedicated, focused time and light-hearted competition into two of the most productive hours of our week! 

    There will be no sharing or critique, only fast-paced, supportive-but-competitive productivity in the company of other writers. It will be fun, exciting, and might be the thing to help you finish (or start...) your manuscript. 

    This group is free for members and only $20 for non-members from August through December.

    Organizer: Amelia Ramsey is a graduate of The Evergreen State College where she studied modern Southern literature and an indie-published author of dozens of steamy romantic shorts, novellas, and novels. She writes and publishes on Amazon under two pseudonyms she's too embarrassed to share with anyone. She's currently working on her first non-romantic

    If you are a BARN member who is interested in joining, contact Amelia at amelia@whereikeep.info




    • Thursday, October 25, 2018
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code WR102518TS
    • 4
    Register

    Learn about travel writing from three experts with many years and miles of experience traveling all over the world. Stefanie Bielekova and Doug Walsh, local travel writers, will share their secrets to success. Whether you want simply to have a record of your own travels or you hope to publish your memories, these writers will have ideas and inspiration for you. 

    Doug Walsh originally created a blog to chronicle the two years he and his wife spent traveling the world by bicycle. He continues to update the blog for his travels far and near.

    Stefanie Bielekova delights in combining her passion for storytelling with the wonders of worldwide wandering. She’s lived in five countries, has traveled to seventy-seven, and has sailed around the world five times while working aboard the Cunard Line of cruise ships. After seven years at sea, Stefanie returned to “land life” by settling down in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. She now works as a Travel Advisor, Speaker, and Tour Assistant for Rick Steves’ Europe and tells tales of travel on her blog, Postcards from Stef.

    • Saturday, October 27, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code WR102718WR
    • 4
    Register

    Dialogue is crucial to any kind of story—fiction, nonfiction, any type of script. But dialog is more than simply writing down realistic conversation. In reality, no one wants to hear (or read) about the weather, or what someone had for lunch (unless it really matters!). 

    Uninteresting dialogue can sink a story like a hole in the hull, while good dialogue makes it sail along beautifully. Writing great dialogue is tricky. 

    In this class you’ll learn to write dialogue that sounds lifelike, yet is carefully constructed so every line mines character background, tension, emotion and intent. 

    Instructor: Warren Read is the author of a 2008 memoir, The Lyncher in Me (Borealis Books), and the 2017 novel, Ash Falls (Ig Publishing). His short fiction has been published in Hot Metal Bridge, Mud Season ReviewSliver of StoneInkletteSwitchback and The East Bay Review. He has been in education for 26 years and is currently an assistant principal with the Bainbridge Island School District.   

    • Saturday, October 27, 2018
    • 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Great Room, BARN, Class Code = WR1018LB
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    Celebrate the chills and thrills of the season at BARN with a scary and fun literary event.*  

    After darkness falls on Saturday, October 27, seven local authors will gather to bewitch you with short, original spooky stories all starting with the same line:

    It was a dark and stormy night . . . 

    Whooooooo’s reading?

    • Best-selling mystery writer Elizabeth George
    • Best-selling Thriller writer Kevin O’Brien
    • Horror writer Ramon Isao
    • Writer and publisher Paul Hanson
    • Guggenheim Fellow, journalist and award-winning author Bruce Barcott
    • Best-selling, critically acclaimed, historical fiction author Megan Chance
    • Emmy -award winning writer Lynn Brunelle

    Sip enchanting potions.

    Nibble on frightening finger foods.

    Come in costume if you like!

    *Please note that this event is geared towards adults.

    Bios of our writer/readers:

    Elizabeth George is the New York Times best selling author of a crime series set in England. Featuring the irascible Detective Sergeant Barbara Havers and the smooth and urbane Detective Inspector Thomas Lynley, the series has been filmed for television by the BBC and translated widely around the world. She's a writing instructor, a non-fiction writer, a young adult novelist, and a passionate lover of dogs. Mostly, she's a passionate lover of dogs. 

    Before his thrillers landed him on the New York Times Bestseller list, Kevin  O’Brien was a railroad inspector.  The author of 19 internationally-published thrillers, he won the Spotted Owl Award for Best Pacific Northwest Mystery, and is a core member of Seattle 7 Writers. Press & Guidesaid: “If Alfred Hitchcock were alive today and writing novels, his name would be Kevin O’Brien.” Kevin’s latest nail-biter, THEY WON’T BE HURT, will be in bookstores this summer.

    Megan Chance is the bestselling, critically acclaimed, award-winning author of several novels. Her novels have been picks for Amazon Book of the Month, Borders Original Voices, and Booksense. Girlposse.comcalls her a “writer of extraordinary talent. Megan Chance lives in the Pacific Northwest.

    A four-time Emmy Award-winning writer for "Bill Nye the Science Guy," Lynn Brunelle has over 25 years experience writing for people of all ages, across all manner of media. Recently she was invited to speak at the UN to discuss science education. Her latest book for kids, Turn This Book into a Beehivewas released Spring 2018 from Workman Publishing. 

    Leafly.com Deputy Editor Bruce Barcott is a Guggenheim Fellow and the author of Weed the People: The Future of Legal Marijuana in America, and TIME Magazine’s special edition, “Marijuana Goes Main Street.” His features and cover stories have appeared in TIME, National Geographic, The New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, and other magazines. His previous books include The Last Flight of the Scarlet Macaw and The Measure of a Mountain. 

    Ramon Isao is a recipient of the Tim McGinnis Award for Fiction, as well as fellowships from Artist Trust and Jack Straw Cultural Center. His writing appears in such places as The Iowa Review, Ninth Letter, City Arts Magazine, Short Run Comics Anthology, and Hobart. His screenplay credits include Zombies of Mass Destruction, Dead Body, and Grow Op, in which he co-stars. He teaches at Hugo House and with Writers in the Schools. 

    Paul Hanson is one of three co-owners of Village Books in Bellingham, Washington and programmer for the Chuckanut Writers Conference and Classes. Before arriving in Bellingham in 2011, Paul was the long-time manager of Eagle Harbor Book Company. He is a writer and publisher, former President of the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association, and past core team member of Fields End.


    • Saturday, November 03, 2018
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR110318JL
    • 10
    Register

    In this class with Jennifer Longo, you will explore the various conventions found in contemporary young adult novels, focusing on working with and against these tropes to create a unique narrative that remains true to its audience. 

    YA novels, no matter the genre, nearly always feature many of the same recognizable characters and relationships, plotlines, and conflicts. New writers may not be familiar with (or fond of) some of these tropes. The authors may feel as if their books need to be shoved through a veritable sieve of conventions that have nothing to do with the narrative.

    You will explore ways to work with and around these, sometimes, irksome elements. During the last part of class, you will examine opening pages of YA-- how they grab and hold the reader and how they are free of conventions. Along with Jennifer Longo, discover how it is possible to create a story that remains true to your vision and yet captivating for the YA reader.

    Here’s a tip from the instructor and successful author: YA is written about, but not always for, a teen audience.

    Instructor: Jennifer Longo is a playwright and novelist with Random House Books. Her first two YA novels, Six Feet Over it and Up To This Pointe were both finalists for the Washington State Book Award. Jen holds a B.A. in Acting from San Francisco State University and an M.F.A. in Playwriting from Humboldt State University. Her next novel (Random House, Fall 2018) is set in her forever home, her best writing inspiration - the beautiful PNW.  

    • Monday, November 05, 2018
    • Monday, November 26, 2018
    • 4 sessions
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, 8890 Three Tree Lane, BI, WA 98110
    Register

    On November 1, participants begin working towards the goal of writing a 50,000-word novel by 11:59 PM on November 30.

    Sign up for NaNoWriMo at https://nanowrimo.org. Then, register here to attend our Day-lighters' sessions that meet four times weekly from 9:30 am-12 pm, beginning Monday, November 5.

    The Day-lighters will challenge the Night-timers to a word war. Fastest writers win. Come join in the productive fun and bring your computer or notepad.

    To learn more about the month-long event and to sign-up for NaNoWriMo, go to https://nanowrimo.org.

    • Monday, November 05, 2018
    • Monday, November 26, 2018
    • 4 sessions
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, 8890 Three Tree Lane, BI, WA 98110
    Register

    On November 1, participants begin working towards the goal of writing a 50,000-word novel by 11:59 PM on November 30.

    Sign up for NaNoWriMo at https://nanowrimo.org. Then, register here to attend our Night-timers' sessions that meet four times weekly from 6-9 pm, beginning Monday, November 5.

    The Night-timers will challenge the Day-lighters to a word war. Fastest writers win. Come join in the productive fun and bring your computer or notepad.

    To learn more about the month-long event and to sign-up for NaNoWriMo, go to https://nanowrimo.org.

    • Saturday, November 10, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • BARN Great Room, Class Code: WR111018KO+
    • 13
    Register

    Few subjects stir a debate more than how to develop a plot. That's why we have invited four Seattle7 authors to discuss plot development in this "mini" conference. 

    Where do you begin? With an idea? Then what? Is your plot action- or character-driven? Do you jot down a few notes and start writing? Do you assemble an outline—sketchy or detailed? Do you just start writing and see where the characters and ideas take you?

    Join authors Kathleen Alcala and Jennie Shortridge, both in the character-driven camp, in the morning as they discuss their ideas on plot development. Then, in the afternoon, join thriller writers, Mike Lawson and Kevin O'Brien, as they put on boxing gloves and go to their separate corners to argue for how they develop an action-driven plot. Though all of these authors use different methods, the result is the same--each consistently turns out bestselling novels.

    A lunch break will be from noon-1 pm. You are free to brown-bag it in our Commons or step out in town. A question-and-answer session will follow each presentation session.

    Presenters: Kathleen Alcalá is the author of six books of fiction and nonfiction. A graduate of the Clarion West Science Fiction and Fantasy Workshop, she has also served as an instructor in the program. Kathleen earned her MA from the University of Washington, and her MFA from the University of New Orleans. Until recently, she was a fiction instructor at the Northwest Institute of Literary Arts on Whidbey Island. Besides her short story collection and three novels, Kathleen has published fiction in numerous anthologies, most recently in the speculative fiction anthology Latin@ Rising, edited by Matthew David Goodwin and published by Wings Press. Her most recent book is The Deepest Roots: Finding Food and Community on a Pacific Northwest Island, from the University of Washington Press. 

    Mike Lawson is the award-winning author of fifteen published novels.  He has been nominated for the Barry Award several times and has twice won the Portland-based Friends of Mystery Award for his Joe DeMarco political thriller series. The latest DeMarco work is House Witness. The first book in his second series, titled Rosarito Beach, involving a rogue DEA agent named Kay Hamilton, was optioned for television. Prior to turning to writing full time, Mike was a nuclear engineer employed by the Navy and he lives in the Northwest.

    Before his thrillers landed him on the New York Times Bestseller list, Kevin O’Brien was a railroad inspector.  The author of eighteen internationally-published thrillers, he won the Spotted Owl Award for Best Pacific Northwest Mystery and is a core member of Seattle 7 Writers. Press & Guide said: “If Alfred Hitchcock were alive today and writing novels, his name would be Kevin O’Brien.” Kevin’s latest nail-biter is Hide Your Fear. He’s hard at work on his nineteenth novel.

    Jennie Shortridge is the author of five bestselling novels, including Love Water Memory and When She Flew. Her books have been translated into several languages and optioned for film, as well as being selected as American Booksellers Association’s Indie Next picks and Library Journal’s Editors’ Picks. An avid volunteer, she is the co-founder of Seattle7Writers, a nonprofit collective of Northwest authors who raise money and awareness for literature and literacy. Learn more at www.jennieshortridge.com.

    • Thursday, November 15, 2018
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code WR111518TS
    • 8
    Register


    Let's just get together and talk. Share your latest writing projects, problems, and ideas. During this event, we will focus on talking about how to form and participate in your own critique/response group at BARN. 

    Sometimes it's pleasant or cathartic to get together with other writers or prospective writers and  share. Register now for this BARN Writers' Forum.

    • Saturday, November 17, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • BARN wide event
    The BARN Bazaar is a new Bainbridge Island holiday tradition featuring a wide variety of art, crafts, and artisan foods, all made by hand. Buy direct from the maker at this annual celebration of the creativity that happens all year round at BARN. From jewelry to wood arts, basketry to weaving, you’ll find an unmatched selection of original handmade items – all made right here at BARN.

    Kick off the holidays in homegrown style. Join us for a day of shopping, food, and community!

    BARN members wishing to participate in this event can contact Membership Coordinator Carla Mackey for an application beginning October 15.


    • Saturday, December 01, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code-WR120118WK
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    Your life is a story, and if told correctly, a very interesting one. There is an art to taking the sprawling events of your life and reducing them down to a personal essay or memoir. Using Bill Kenower’s unique inside-out approach to writing, we will look at how to tell the fine difference between telling a story about your life, and using your life to tell a story. Students taking this class can expect to learn:

    • How to find the narrative arc in a personal story.
    • How to write about painful memories.
    • How to write about people who have mistreated you.
    • How to turn the most challenging moments from your life into a story that can help others.
    InstructorWilliam Kenower is the author of Fearless Writing: How to Create Boldly and Write With Confidence, and Write Within Yourself: An Author’s Companion, the Editor-in-Chief of Author magazine, and a sought-after speaker and teacher. In addition to his books he’s been published in The New York Times and Edible Seattle, and has been a featured blogger for the Huffington Post. His video interviews with hundreds of writers from Nora Ephron, to Amy Tan, to William Gibson are widely considered the best of their kind on the Internet. He also hosts the online radio program Author2Author where every week he and a different guest discuss the books we write and the lives we lead. 
    • Saturday, December 08, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, WR120818JJ
    • 3
    Register

    Whether you attended "The Art and Craft of the Query: Part 1, The Nuts and Bolts" in May or you have a draft of a query letter in need of review, this workshop will help you prepare the final draft.We’ll look at each query letter, assess its effectiveness and impact, and work together to sharpen the query’s essentials with particular emphasis on the pitch.

    A maximum of only six students will participate in this class.

    Please bring a draft of your query letter to share. Your query should be fully-formed—we won’t be writing letters from scratch—but don’t worry if it’s rough. The goal of this workshop is to refine your query so it’s an irresistible call to action for a literary agent to represent your work.

    *This workshop will focus on works of fiction and memoir; narrative nonfiction queries are usually accompanied by substantive proposals, which are animals of a different sort. But non-fiction writers are encouraged to participate; the basic principles hold true for any one-page query letter, which all writers will be expected to present.

    Instructor: Julie Christine Johnson is the award-winning author of the novels In Another Life (Sourcebooks, 2016) and The Crows of Beara (Ashland Creek Press, 2017). Her short stories and essays have appeared in several journals, including Emerge Literary Journal; Mud Season Review; Cirque: A Literary Journal of the North Pacific Rim; Cobalt; River Poets Journal, in the print anthologies Stories for Sendai; Up, Do: Flash Fiction by Women Writers; and Three Minus One: Stories of Love and Loss; and featured on the flash fiction podcast No Extra Words. She holds undergraduate degrees in French and Psychology and a Master’s in International Affairs. Julie leads writing workshops and seminars and offers story/developmental editing and writer coaching services. 

    A hiker, yogi, and wine geek, Julie makes her home on the Olympic Peninsula of northwest Washington state. 

    • Saturday, January 12, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR011219WK
    • 8
    Register

    In this Part II of Your Life Is a Story: The Art of Memoir, we'll take a deeper dive into the memoir, looking more closely at how we approach personal storytelling as a work of art, how we can look upon the events of our lives as raw material to create something original and transformative.

    We’ll also workshop more samples from writers who took Memoir Part I, and see how they were able to apply the lessons learned there. Additionally, we'll discuss the challenges students faced working with the rules learned in Part I. Finally, we’ll discuss what it means not just to be writer, but also an author, about the unique challenges of sharing stories from our lives with complete strangers.

    Instructor: William Kenower is the author of Fearless Writing: How to Create Boldly and Write With Confidence, and Write Within Yourself: An Author’s Companion, the Editor-in-Chief of Author magazine, and a sought-after speaker and teacher. In addition to his books he’s been published in The New York Times and Edible Seattle, and has been a featured blogger for the Huffington Post. His video interviews with hundreds of writers from Nora Ephron, to Amy Tan, to William Gibson are widely considered the best of their kind on the Internet. He also hosts the online radio program Author2Author where every week he and a different guest discuss the books we write and the lives we lead. 

    • Saturday, January 26, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR
    • 12
    Register

    This generative course gives students the opportunity to write in three different literary genres: fiction, poetry, and nonfiction. Students will learn basic skills used to create literature, as well as the craft fundamentals used in the three genres: Story, scene, and character in fiction; imagery, figurative language, and sound in poetry; memory/meaning, action/reflection, and writing-through-discovery in nonfiction.

    Throughout the session, students can expect a combination of lectures, in-class writing exercises, short reading activities, and informal discussion.

    Previous experience with creative writing is not necessary.

    Instructor Bio: 
    Janee J. Baugher is the author of Coördinates of Yes (Ahadada Books) and The Body’s Physics (Tebot Bach), and she holds an MFA from Eastern Washington University. Her creative writing has been published in over 100 literary journals, including Tin House, The Southern Review, The American Journal of Poetry, Nimrod International Journal of Prose and Poetry, Boulevard, Nano Fiction, and The Writer’s Chronicle. Since 1999 Baugher has taught creative writing in primary and secondary schools, at arts camps and libraries, and at colleges and universities. Additionally, she’s held editorial positions at several journals, including Willow Springs, Switched-on Gutenberg, and StringTown, and she’s currently a poetry reader for Boulevard. http://JaneeJBaugher.wordpress.com

    • Saturday, February 09, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code-WR020919WR+
    • 11
    Register

    For this exciting and unusual class, join two instructors--one a writer and one an actress, one accustomed to breathing life into a character through words and one accustomed to taking the writer's words and giving them life.  

    Mining well-rounded and believable character is probably the most important element in fiction—every action and result will depend upon it. Developing unique and complex characters is a process of not only creation, but also of discovery. In this workshop the instructors will introduce a variety of activities that will help you do just this, thereby providing a toolbox that will take your fiction to new levels. By combining writing and acting exercises, you will give dimension to existing characters, develop new characters, and better view the world through the character’s point of view. Please wear comfortable clothes and bring a light lunch. Snacks and water will be provided.

    InstructorsWarren Read is the author of a 2008 memoir, The Lyncher in Me (Borealis Books), and the 2017 novel, Ash Falls (Ig Publishing). His short fiction has been published in Hot Metal Bridge, Mud Season ReviewSliver of StoneInkletteSwitchback and The East Bay Review. He has been in education for 26 years and is currently an assistant principal with the Bainbridge Island School District.

    Dinah Manoff is a Tony Award winning actress. She has starred in a number of television series, including the classic Soap. Manoff is best known for her portrayal as Carol Weston, the character she played for seven years on the series, Empty Nest, and for the memorable Pink Lady, Marty Maraschino in the film Grease. Other films include Ordinary People in which she co-starred opposite Timothy Hutton as Karen his suicidal best friend and I Oughta be in Pictures opposite Walter Matthau. Manoff has also worked as a television writer and director. She is the daughter of writer Arnold Manoff and Oscar winning actress Lee Grant. Currently, Manoff resides with her family on Bainbridge Island where she writes, coaches, and teaches acting with the Northwest Actors Lab.

     

    • Wednesday, February 13, 2019
    • Wednesday, March 20, 2019
    • 6 sessions
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code: WR031319KA
    • 12
    Register

    Speculative fiction includes any work that uses fantasy, science fiction, horror, science fantasy, superhero, and supernatural. From Harry Potter to The Man in the High Castle, speculative fiction gathers stories from many corners of the writing universe, and so is of interest to a wide range of readers. 
    Some of the basics of craft will be covered, including setting (world building), dialogue, conflict, the use of time (flashbacks, parallel timelines, etc), and in particular, the development of characters. 
    This six-session class will be a workshop for writers with at least one chapter or story in progress. The group will offer supportive feedback under the guidance of a well-published author, as well as brief craft lessons that will enable you to develop confidence in your own ability to edit. We will read a few short examples along the way to give us common ground for discussion.

    Note to those who took the 2018 class:Enroll in the 2019 version of Speculative Fiction and benefit from having your project workshopped in a supportive environment. New short stories will be assigned and craft topics with add depth to discussions. 

    Instructor: Kathleen Alcalá is the author of six books of fiction, essays and creative nonfiction, including recent works in science fiction and fantasy anthologies. An Island Treasure in the Arts, she has extensive experience teaching at the post-graduate level, as well as in all-age classrooms. More at http://www.kathleenalcala.com.

    • Saturday, March 02, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR030219WK
    • 11
    Register

    The personal essay is a unique blend of storytelling, lessons, and poetry. Not quite memoir, not quite self-help, it is a form that lends itself to blogs, essays for magazines, or opinions for newspapers. 

    In this workshop we’ll look at the structural foundation of the personal essay, as well as learn some simple tools to help authors use their life experiences as limitless source material. Most importantly, we’ll dig into how best to offer readers lessons without being dogmatic or obvious so that our essays can be both entertaining and inspiring.

    Bring a brown bag lunch.

    Instructor: William Kenower is the author of Fearless Writing: How to Create Boldly and Write With Confidence, andWrite Within Yourself: An Author’s Companion, the Editor-in-Chief of Authormagazine, and a sought-after speaker and teacher. In addition to his books he’s been published in The New York Timesand Edible Seattle, and has been a featured blogger for the Huffington Post. His video interviews with hundreds of writers from Nora Ephron, to Amy Tan, to William Gibson are widely considered the best of their kind on the Internet. He also hosts the online radio program Author2Author where every week he and a different guest discuss the books we write and the lives we lead. 


    • Saturday, March 09, 2019
    • 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
    • BARN, Writers' Studio, Class Code WR030919BJ
    • 12
    Register

    Ready to take publishing into your own hands, but overwhelmed by all of the options and decisions involved? This class will walk you through the nitty-gritty decisions of the self-publishing process (without trying to sell you on any particular service or path). One size does not fit all when it comes to self publishing.

    Format decisions: should you have an e-book? A print book? Both? We’ll talk about:

    • Book formatting: tips and tricks for creating a clean, professional looking e-book and print design
    • The legalities: ISBNs, copyright registration, and more.
    • Cover design: Don’t try this at home. (Or if you’re a DIY artist, follow these guidelines.)
    • Cover Copy: The most important 200 words you’ll write as a self-publishing author

    We’ll also talk about when and how to hire freelancers, what research says about the best pricing strategies, and how to avoid the scams and pitfalls that trap self-publishing authors along the way. 

    Bring material to take notes (laptop, tablet, or notebook/pen).

    Instructor: 
    Beth Jusino is a publishing consultant for both traditional and self-publishing authors, with almost twenty years of experience helping writers navigate the complicated space between manuscript and final book. A former literary agent and marketing director, she’s the author of the award-winning The Author's Guide to Marketing and has ghostwritten or collaborated on half a dozen additional titles. Beth is a member of the Northwest Independent Editors Guild, a regular speaker for Seattle Public Library’s #SeattleWrites workshops, and has taught at writers’ conferences across the country. Visit her online at www.bethjusino.com or on Twitter @bethjusino. 



    Posted 8-18-18/tt/min6

    • Saturday, March 16, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR
    • 12
    Register

    Setting should be much more than the location where your novel takes place. At its best, setting establishes not only atmosphere and mood, but becomes a character on its own, and one woven so inextricably into the story that the reader cannot imagine it could be placed anywhere else.

    In this workshop, Megan Chance explains how to approach setting as an indispensable part of storytelling, how to utilize research, description, point of view, symbolism and word choice to create a setting as multilayered and integral to your novel as character or plot.


    M
    egan Chance is the bestselling, critically acclaimed, award-winning author of several novels. Her novels have been picks for Amazon Book of the Month, Borders Original Voices, and Booksense. Girlposse.com calls her a “writer of extraordinary talent. Megan Chance lives in the Pacific Northwest.


    • Saturday, April 13, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR041319AC
    • 12
    Register

    Point-of-view can be defined as the narrative perspective from which a work is written. The types include first person, second person and third person. 

    As a writer, you'll use different perspectives depending on what type of work you are writing, as well as on what you're trying to do with it. In this class, we'll define each type of point-of-view, look at examples, and explore how each is useful and how each has drawbacks. 

    We’ll also be practicing using various points-of-view. So, bring a current work-in-progress with you to class, if you have one. If not, then that’s fine!

    InstructorAnne Clermont is the author of Learning to Fall, a novel which was a 2016 Foreword Indies Finalist in general fiction and received praise from Robert Goolrick, Ellen Sussman, Sonja Yoerg, Tracy Guzemen, and others. It was featured in Coastal Living, Redbook, Popsugar, Buzz Feed, SheKnows, Inside Chic, Brit+Co and more. Her work experience ranges from animal behavior to animal nutrition to cancer research, which has been published in a number of peer-reviewed scientific journals – including Nature Biotechnology. She currently divides her time between writing and working as an editor and website designer for her company, Bookish Media. You can learn more about her at www.anneclermont.com or www.bookish.media.


    • Saturday, May 04, 2019
    • Saturday, May 11, 2019
    • 2 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR050419AG
    • 12
    Register

    The publishing world has changed dramatically with the eruption of the digital economy and social media networks. In today’s world, publishers and agents demand not only high-quality content but a digital presence for authors in order to publish their creation.

    In this two-session Saturday class, Antonio Garcia will introduce the basic concepts of digital marketing and social media marketing to build an online presence for writers. The classes will cover the differences between a website and a blog, basic concepts of SEO (search engine optimization), social media strategy and content marketing. 

    Bring your laptop, smartphone and notepad and start or continue growing your digital presence to get website traffic, followers and likes and to increase your chances of grabbing the attention of publishers and agents.

    InstructorAntonio Garcia is a brand strategist and art director who started his career in advertising and marketing 15 years ago in Madrid (Spain). Since then he has worked in London (United Kingdom), Portland and now the Greater Seattle Area. He has worked for advertising agencies, start-ups, non-profit organizations, educational institutions and as a freelance consultant.


    • Saturday, June 01, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR060119DM
    • 75
    Register

    The emotional effect of fiction on readers is a craft.  Based on psychological research and study of what makes novels emotionally gripping, this intensive workshop takes participants beyond showing or telling to create an emotional journey for readers—one unseen but nevertheless deeply felt and ultimately unforgettable.  

    While writers might disagree over showing versus telling or plotting versus pantsing, none would argue this: if you want to write strong fiction, you must make your readers feel. The reader's experience must be an emotional journey of its own, one as involving as your characters' struggles, discoveries, and triumphs are for you.

    That's where The Emotional Craft of Fiction comes in. In his book, veteran literary agent and expert fiction instructor Donald Maass shows you how to use story to provoke a visceral and emotional experience in readers. Topics covered include:

    ·       emotional modes of writing

    ·       beyond showing versus telling

    ·       your story's emotional world

    ·       moral stakes

    ·       connecting the inner and outer journeys

    ·       plot as emotional opportunities

    ·       invoking higher emotions, symbols, and emotional language

    ·       cascading change

    ·       story as emotional mirror

    ·       positive spirit and magnanimous writing

    ·       the hidden current that makes stories move

    This is an intensive, hands-on workshop for fiction writers.  Participants should bring a WIP and writing materials.

    Presenter bio: A literary agent in New York, Donald Maass’s agency sells more than 150 novels every year to major publishers in the U.S. and overseas.  He is the author of The Career Novelist (1996), Writing the Breakout Novel (2001), Writing the Breakout Novel Workbook(2004) and The Fire in Fiction (2009), Writing 21stCentury Fiction (2012) and The Emotional Craft of Fiction (2016).  He is a past president of the Association of Authors’ Representatives, Inc.

    • Saturday, June 22, 2019
    • 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR062219BJ
    • 12
    Register

    This workshop takes an unbiased and unvarnished look at a modern writer’s publishing options, from “Big 5” traditional publishers to small presses to self publishing (with or without the support of service companies) to “hybrid” and other emerging models. Taught by a publishing professional who works on and appreciates both sides of the fence, this class gets past the hype and examines pros and cons of each choice, realistic costs and income potential, as well as scams and pitfalls to avoid. Most importantly, it helps writers seeking publication understand their own goals, strengths, and how to make a decision that's best for them.

    Attendees will…

    1. Be able to identify the broad range of choices available for publishing: big presses, small presses, independent self publishing, subsidy and “author assisted” presses, and emerging models. 
    2. Gain a realistic impression of the costs, timing, and logistics involved in producing a book. 
    3. Have clear guidelines (a checklist of questions) to help them consider the best options for their specific situation.

    Instructor: 
    Beth Jusino is a publishing consultant for both traditional and self-publishing authors, with almost twenty years of experience helping writers navigate the complicated space between manuscript and final book. A former literary agent and marketing director, she’s the author of the award-winning The Author's Guide to Marketing and has ghostwritten or collaborated on half a dozen additional titles. Beth is a member of the Northwest Independent Editors Guild, a regular speaker for Seattle Public Library’s #SeattleWrites workshops, and has taught at writers’ conferences across the country. Visit her online at www.bethjusino.com or on Twitter @bethjusino. 



    Posted 8-18-18/tt/min6

    • Wednesday, September 18, 2019
    • Wednesday, October 23, 2019
    • 6 sessions
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code: WR091819KA
    • 12
    Register

    This six-week course will focus on shaping research, family stories, and other source materials into a form that will appeal to a contemporary reader. We will focus on the emotional development of your characters, as well as setting, scene, and dialogue, to bring fresh language to situations and characters. Sensory detail draws the reader into the story, but we must also empathize with the characters and fully inhabit their worlds. One of the most successful genres in both commercial and literary publishing today, readers of all ages find a well-imagined historical novel irresistible.

    We will end by discussing how to approach an agent or editor, cover letters, the synopsis, and possible markets. 

    Instructor: Kathleen Alcalá’s trilogy on nineteenth century Mexico was published by Chronicle Books: Spirits of the Ordinary, The Flower in the Skull, and Treasures in Heaven. Her work has received the Western States Book Award, the Governor's Writers Award, a Pacific Northwest Bookseller's Award, and a Washington State Book Award. A co-founder and contributing editor to The Raven Chronicles, Kathleen has been a writer in residence at Richard Hugo House and was permanent faculty in the Northwest Institute of Literary Arts MFA Program on Whidbey Island. Kathleen is also the author of a short story collection, Mrs. Vargas and the Dead NaturalistThe Desert Remembers My Name, essays on family and writing, and most recently, The Deepest Roots: Finding Food and Community on a Pacific Northwest Island from the University of Washington Press.

    • Saturday, October 12, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR
    • 12
    Register

    This generative class is perfect for anyone who wishes to study the craft of writing-from-life. Students will learn basic skills used to create literary nonfiction, as well as the craft fundamentals used: tension, chronology, vivid description, pacing, and point-of-view. 

    Whether you’re writing a full memoir, a personal essay, or have never written before, this class is for you. Throughout the session, students can expect a combination of lectures, in-class writing exercises, short reading activities, and informal discussion.

    All levels welcome.

    Bring to class:  An excerpt of an autobiographical work-in-progress and/or an object that has sentimental value.

    Instructor Bio:
    Janee Baugher is the author of Coördinates of Yes (Ahadada Books) and The Body’s Physics (Tebot Bach), and she holds an MFA from Eastern Washington University. Her creative writing has been published in over 100 literary journals, including Tin House, The Southern Review, The American Journal of Poetry, Nimrod International Journal of Prose and Poetry, Boulevard, Nano Fiction, and The Writer’s Chronicle. Since 1999 Baugher has taught creative writing in primary and secondary schools, at arts camps and libraries, and at colleges and universities. Additionally, she’s held editorial positions at several journals, including Willow Springs, Switched-on Gutenberg, and StringTown, and she’s currently a poetry reader for Boulevard. To learn more about Janee Baugher see: http://JaneeJBaugher.wordpress.com

    • Wednesday, October 30, 2019
    • Wednesday, November 20, 2019
    • 4 sessions
    • Writers' Room, BARN, WR103019WR
    • 12
    Register

    It’s time to take your writing seriously. Warren Read—writer, educator, and published author—will guide you through every step of writing a short story in this four-session workshop. 

    The class will cover what makes a short story, character development, setting, dialogue, and point of view. Each session will include writing advice, fluency prompts, sharing your work with class members, and writing groups/workshopping. Between meetings, you will focus on developing your short story.

    All levels of writers are welcome. You might dust off an old story you began years ago, come to class with an idea for a story, or attend the first session with no clue what you want to write. It’s all okay because the first class will begin with brainstorming activities. You’ll leave with a clear direction in mind.

    Warren Read will use excerpts and ideas from Ron Carlson Writes a Story. You are encouraged to get a copy from the library, Amazon, Kindle, iBooks, and others.     

    Instructor Bio: Warren Read is the author of a memoir, The Lyncher in Me (2009, Borealis Books) and the novel, Ash Falls (2017, Ig Publishing). His fiction has appeared in Hot Metal Bridge, Mud Season Review, Sliver of Stone, Inklette, Switchback Magazine and the Christmas issue of East Bay Review. He is an assistant principal in Bainbridge Island, WA; in 2015 he received his MFA in from the Rainier Writing Workshop at Pacific Lutheran University. Learn more about Warren at www.warren-read.com.


    • Saturday, November 02, 2019
    • Saturday, November 16, 2019
    • 2 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR11618MB
    • 12
    Register

    So you want to write a novel? Or you’ve written 40,000 words of a novel, and suddenly find yourself stuck. Or your stories are interesting but lack a real plot.

    Michele Bacon is here to help. Over the course of two Saturdays, she’ll put you to work on developing a compelling protagonist, raising the stakes, and plotting your manuscript. Come with a full story idea or with only a desire to write a novel. You’ll leave with clear direction and a plot waiting to become a manuscript.

    The two sessions will include brief lectures, hands-on workshops, one-on-one discussion with Michele, and some partner work with other students.

    Please feel free to bring a lunch. BARN has a refrigerator to store your lunch in.

    Instructor

    Michele Bacon is the author of contemporary young adult novels Antipodes and Life Before.  Her work focuses on families, friends, and the complicated relationships therein. When she’s not writing, Michele loves skiing, playing tabletop games, traveling, and dreaming of travel. She’s visited all 50 states and dozens of countries, always eager to hear people’s stories and immerse herself in other cultures. Wherever she goes, Michele enjoys helping writers find their voices and tell their stories. And she loves coming home to Seattle, where she lives with her partner and three young children.



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