Writers' upcoming events

    • Wednesday, February 07, 2018
    • Wednesday, March 14, 2018
    • 6 sessions
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code WR0218KA
    • 3

    Speculative fiction is a big umbrella genre. It includes any work that uses fantasy, science fiction, horror, science fantasy, superhero, and supernatural. From Harry Potter to The Man in the High Castle, speculative fiction gathers stories from many corners of the writing universe, and so is of interest to a wide range of readers. 

    Craft focus will include setting (world building), dialogue, conflict, the use of time (flashbacks, parallel timelines, etc), and in particular, the development of characters. 

    This is a 6 session class held Wednesday evenings. This will be a workshop for writers with at least one chapter or story in progress. The group will offer supportive feedback under the guidance of a well-published author, as well as brief craft lessons on character development that will enable you to develop confidence in your own ability to edit. We will read a couple of short examples along the way to give us common ground for discussion. The class will have a maximum of twelve and a minimum of six people. 

    Instructor: Kathleen Alcalá is the author of six books of fiction and nonfiction. A graduate of the Clarion West Science Fiction and Fantasy Workshop, she has also served as an instructor in the program. Kathleen earned her MA from the University of Washington, and her MFA from the University of New Orleans. Until recently, she was a fiction instructor at the Northwest Institute of Literary Arts on Whidbey Island. Besides her short story collection and three novels, Kathleen has published fiction in numerous anthologies, most recently in the speculative fiction anthology Latin@ Rising, edited by Matthew David Goodwin and published by Wings Press. Her most recent book is The Deepest Roots: Finding Food and Community on a Pacific Northwest Island, from the University of Washington Press.

       

    • Saturday, March 03, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code-WR0318WR
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    For this exciting and unusual class, join two instructors--one a writer and one an actress, one accustomed to breathing life into a character through words and one accustomed to taking the writer's words and giving them life.  

    Mining well-rounded and believable character is probably the most important element in fiction—every action and result will depend upon it. Developing unique and complex characters is a process of not only creation, but also of discovery. In this workshop the instructors will introduce a variety of activities that will help you do just this, thereby providing a toolbox that will take your fiction to new levels. By combining writing and acting exercises, you will give dimension to existing characters, develop new characters, and better view the world through the character’s point of view. Please wear comfortable clothes and bring a light lunch. Snacks and water will be provided.

    InstructorsWarren Read is the author of a 2008 memoir, The Lyncher in Me (Borealis Books), and the 2017 novel, Ash Falls (Ig Publishing). His short fiction has been published in Hot Metal Bridge, Mud Season ReviewSliver of StoneInkletteSwitchback and The East Bay Review. He has been in education for 26 years and is currently an assistant principal with the Bainbridge Island School District.

    Dinah Manoff is a Tony Award winning actress. She has starred in a number of television series, including the classic Soap. Manoff is best known for her portrayal as Carol Weston, the character she played for seven years on the series, Empty Nest, and for the memorable Pink Lady, Marty Maraschino in the film Grease. Other films include Ordinary People in which she co-starred opposite Timothy Hutton as Karen his suicidal best friend and I Oughta be in Pictures opposite Walter Matthau. Manoff has also worked as a television writer and director. She is the daughter of writer Arnold Manoff and Oscar winning actress Lee Grant. Currently, Manoff resides with her family on Bainbridge Island where she writes, coaches, and teaches acting with the Northwest Actors Lab.

     

    • Wednesday, March 14, 2018
    • 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, 8890 Three Tree Lane, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110
    • 12
    Register


    The Welcome to the BARN Writers' Studio is designed for members. Before attending one of these sessions, be sure you are a BARN member and have obtained your fob for entry into BARN.

    Then, at this orientation session, we will give you the information you need to have fob access into the Writers' Studio.

    • Saturday, March 17, 2018
    • 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • BARN, Writers' Studio, Class Code WR0318BJ
    • 6
    Register

    Ready to take publishing into your own hands, but overwhelmed by all of the options and decisions involved?This class will walk you through the nitty-gritty decisions of the self-publishing process (without trying to sell you on any particular service or path).One size does not fit all when it comes to self publishing.  

    We’ll talk about:

    • Format decisions: should you have an e-book? A print book? Both?
    • Book formatting: tips and tricks for creating a clean, professional looking e-book and print design
    • The legalities: ISBNs, copyright registration, and more.
    • Cover design: Don’t try this at home. (Or if you’re a DIY artist, follow these guidelines.)
    • Cover Copy: The most important 200 words you’ll write as a self-publishing author

    We’ll also talk about when and how to hire freelancers, what research says about the best pricing strategies, and how to avoid the scams and pitfalls that trap self-publishing authors along the way. 

    Bring material to take notes (laptop, tablet, or notebook/pen).

    Note: In 2017, this popular class sold out and had a waitlist.

    Instructor: Beth Jusino is a publishing consultant for both traditional and self-publishing authors, with almost twenty years of experience helping writers navigate the complicated space between manuscript and final book. A former literary agent and marketing director, she’s the author of the award-winning The Author's Guide to Marketing and has ghostwritten or collaborated on half a dozen additional titles. Beth is a member of the Northwest Independent Editors Guild, a regular speaker for Seattle Public Library’s #SeattleWrites workshops, and has taught at writers’ conferences across the country. Visit her online at www.bethjusino.com or on Twitter @bethjusino. 

    • Thursday, March 22, 2018
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code WR0318TS
    • 11
    Register

    Let's just get together and talk. Share your latest writing projects, problems, and ideas. For this Forum, we have invited BARN's own Carla Mackey to share her experiences in Italy walking one segment of the Via Francigena, how she organized to keep accurate notes, and what she plans to do with the information now. Though she is focused on writing a travel guide, come share your questions and ideas for any of your writing projects--those finished, those just begun, or those still in your head. 

    Sometimes it's pleasant or cathartic to get together with other writers or prospective writers and  share. There is no better place to do that than a monthly Forum. Register now for this BARN Writers' Forum.

    • Saturday, April 07, 2018
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code-WR0418JB
    • 9
    Register

    In this all-day workshop, veteran developmental editor Jason Black will lead you through a deep-dive of how narrative works and give you twelve hands-on skills for elevating your prose from good to great.

    The morning session covers the bedrock technique behind narrative: “show, don’t tell.” This core principle behind powerful narrative is widely misunderstood. Jason will fix that, leaving you with a clear understanding of when, why, and how to show, rather than tell, in your own writing. 

    The afternoon session delivers twelve crack techniques for self-editing and revision that will push your prose to new levels of clarity and elegance. The afternoon ends with an open-ended, “ask me anything” style Q&A on any questions relating to writing craft, story structure, and character development.

    For both sessions, you should bring a scene from their current work-in-progress for the in-class exercises and discussions. Don’t forget to bring a laptop or notepad as well!

    There will be an hour for lunch during the session. Bringing a sack lunch is a great idea.

    Instructor: Jason Black is a Seattle-area developmental editor who has helped scores of writers find the best in their work over the past nine years. Jason teaches writing, story structure, and character development classes through the Pacific Northwest Writers Association. He is a regular speaker at the PNWA Writers’ Conference and a member of the Northwest Independent Editors Guild’s speakers’ bureau. In addition to his blog, Jason's articles on writing craft have been featured in PNWA's Author magazine and the literary journal Line Zero. Jason edits for novelists in all genres, though his own novels, Bread for the Pharaoh, Pebblehoof, and Blackpelt are all middle-grade fiction. Find Jason online at PlotToPunctuation.com, or on Twitter as @p2p_editor.

    • Wednesday, April 11, 2018
    • Wednesday, April 25, 2018
    • 3 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code-WR0418HH
    • 11
    Register

    Are you curious about poetry, but not sure how to begin? To write poetry, you don't have to wait for the muse to whisper in your ear. Most poets have simply learned how to pay attention to the world around them, finding that poems are everywhere if you know how and where to look. 

    This April, celebrate National Poetry Month by giving your inner poet free rein to explore. We'll focus on generating poems each week through lively writing prompts, then sharing them in a supportive environment. For inspiration, we’ll read examples of the types of poems we’re exploring, written by both classic and contemporary poets. No poetry writing experience necessary; all levels welcome.

    Instructor: Holly J. Hughes is coauthor of The Pen and The Bell: Mindful Writing in a Busy World (Skinner House Press, 2012), author of Passings (Expedition Press, 2016) and Sailing by Ravens (University of Alaska Press, 2014), and editor of the anthology Beyond Forgetting: Poetry and Prose about Alzheimer’s Disease (Kent State University Press, 2009).

    She has taught writing at Edmonds Community College for more than 25 years as well as at regional conferences and workshops, including LitFuse, FishTrap, Write on the Sound, the North Cascades Institute, and Pacific Lutheran University’s low-residency MFA program, the Rainier Writers Workshop.  www.hollyjhughes.com

    For questions, contact Jenn Hager, jhager.editor@gmail.com

    • Saturday, April 14, 2018
    • 12:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, WR0418RT-1
    • 7
    Register
    In Part I of these how-to classes on writing blogs, you will learn how to plan and create a blog site, whether it’s for your personal expression or to promote a business or cause. This session will be mostly lecture and will cover topics such as:
    •  How to plan a blog, from deciding on a theme to planning a long-term content strategy that keeps the blog consistent and active
    • The nuts and bolts and blogging, including how to legally find and use photos and graphics, how to optimize articles for readers, and how to write to a target audience
    • An overview of available free blogging platforms as well as inexpensive options for hosting your own blog with a personal link
    • Tips and tricks for creative storytelling to keep readers engaged

    Note: You may register for 

    • Part I (How to Plan and Create a Blog)
    • Part II (How to Set Up a Blog) (April 28) REGISTER FOR PT. II
    • or both Part I and II (if you choose to take both classes, you must register for each class individually.)

    NOTE:  Instructions will be provided for creating a WordPress account in this first session.


    Instructor: 

    Rodika Tollefson is a writer, editor and multimedia producer with more than 17 years of experience in journalism and communications. She is an internationally published writer, contributing writer and editor to local publications as well as managing editor of WestSound Home & Garden’s blog. Rodika has written bylined, nonbylined and ghostwritten articles for commercial blogs for Kitsap Peninsula businesses and nonprofits as well as national and international companies (including American Express OPEN Forum, GoToMeeting and Join.Me, Hertz and more than a dozen cybersecurity companies). She’s dabbled with a few personal blogs, and her current work also includes providing editorial direction and article ideation for commercial blogs.

    Rodika has a bachelor’s degree in journalism and communications (cum laude) from the University of Alaska Anchorage and a master’s degree in digital media from the University of Washington. She has won various awards for her journalism and video work.

    • Friday, April 20, 2018
    • 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Bloedel Reserve, 7571 NE Dolphin Dr, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110, Class Code: WR0418HH-2
    • 14
    Register

    This year, celebrate National Poetry Month by spending an afternoon at Bloedel Reserve, walking with classic poets as your companions.

    Following in the footsteps of the Japanese haiku and English Romantic poets, you’ll put on walking shoes and pick up pens, reading poems posted for inspiration as you write your way around the garden. You'll conclude your walk at the Japanese Guest House where you'll share poems/sketches and contribute lines for a collaborative Japanese renga or linked verse. You can write poetry or you can write prose.

    Please wear walking shoes and dress for rain or shine. 

    Meet at 1 pm at the entry gate for Bloedel Reserve (7571 NE Dolphin Dr, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110)

    Instructor: Holly J. Hughes is the author of Sailing by Ravens  (University of Alaska Press, 2014), coauthor of The Pen and The Bell: Mindful Writing in a Busy World (Skinner House Press, 2012), and editor of the award-winning anthology, Beyond Forgetting: Poetry and Prose about Alzheimer’s Disease (Kent State University Press, 2009).  Her fine-art chapbook Passings (Expedition Press, 2016) received an American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation in 2017.  She taught writing at Edmonds Community College for more than 25 years, as well as at regional conferences and workshops, including LitFuse, FishTrap, Write on the Sound, the North Cascades Institute, and Pacific Lutheran University’s low-residency MFA program, the Rainier Writers Workshop. http://hollyjhughes.com/

    Please contact Julie Leung at julie@bainbridgebarn.org with any questions.

    • Thursday, April 26, 2018
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code WR0426TS
    • 13
    Register

    Editing is rarely an author’s favorite part of the path to a finished manuscript. It hurts. You have to kill your darlings and admit to having tried occasionally to get away with a less than perfectly phrased sentence. At our April 26 Roundtable, Genevieve Olivarez-Conklin, Anne Clermont, and Martha Cunningham, all professional editors, will talk about what to expect from the different types of editing, how to get help, and what to do with it when you get it.

    Instructor bios:

    Genevieve Olivarez-Conklin is a freelance editor focusing on developmental editing and copyediting. As a graduate of the University of Washington Editing Certificate Program and having completed the Author-Editor Clinic course on developmental editing, she has concentrated on editing mainstream fiction, women’s fiction, and romance. She has also completed the Popular Fiction and Literary Fiction writing programs at the University of Washington. In her day job, she reviews proposals and contracts for content and edits accordingly.

    Anne Clermont pursued her first writing via The Writing Salon in San Francisco and continued under the mentorship of best-selling authors like Ellen Sussman and Maria Semple. She has participated in conferences in California, Maui, and the Bahamas and continues her education via books on writing, classes, and group critiques. Anne now devotes her time to writing, working as a development editor, and as a website designer for her company, Bookish Media.

    Martha Cunningham is an editor with experience in marketing, legal services, educational materials, and publishing. From newsletters to novels, she has edited for real estate, legal, narratives, instructional manuals, advertising, and academic writings. In an Assistant Editor Internship with Mountaineer Books, she did copyediting for various publications, reviewed submissions and corresponded with authors.  She has an Editing Certificate from University of Washington and attended an Author-Editor Clinic with Barbara Sjoholm where she learned to work with authors, write editorial correspondence, and do developmental editing.

    • Saturday, April 28, 2018
    • 12:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, WR0418RT-2
    • 10
    Register

    Part II of these how-to classes on writing blogs will be a hands-on demonstration WordPress session that will help you set up your own free blog at wordpress.com.

    Please bring a laptop if you’d like to follow along with the instructor to launch your own blog and practice publishing in WordPress. This session will cover:
    • Where and how to find themes (templates)
    • How to create and publish a post
    • Other WordPress features, such as the difference between a page and a post, plug-ins and widgets and more

    Note: You may register for 

    • Part I (How to Plan and Create a Blog) (April 14) REGISTER FOR PT. I
    • Part II (How to Set Up a Blog) 
    • or both Part I and II (if you choose to take both classes, you must register for each class individually.)

    NOTE:  Instructions will be provided for creating a WordPress account in the first session. If you did not attend Part I and you have questions about how to create an account, email Teri Smith at: Writers.Lead@BainbridgeBARN.org.


    Instructor: 

    Rodika Tollefson is a writer, editor and multimedia producer with more than 17 years of experience in journalism and communications. She is an internationally published writer, contributing writer and editor to local publications as well as managing editor of WestSound Home & Garden’s blog. Rodika has written bylined, nonbylined and ghostwritten articles for commercial blogs for Kitsap Peninsula businesses and nonprofits as well as national and international companies (including American Express OPEN Forum, GoToMeeting and Join.Me, Hertz and more than a dozen cybersecurity companies). She’s dabbled with a few personal blogs, and her current work also includes providing editorial direction and article ideation for commercial blogs.

    Rodika has a bachelor’s degree in journalism and communications (cum laude) from the University of Alaska Anchorage and a master’s degree in digital media from the University of Washington. She has won various awards for her journalism and video work.

    • Wednesday, May 02, 2018
    • Wednesday, May 23, 2018
    • 4 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code-WR0518JM
    • 4
    Register

    In this 4 session class, you will explore the genre of picture books via classic and contemporary examples, with a focus on current publishing preferences and practices. 

    Your look at this unique literary form will cover topics such as narrative structure, character development, word choice, the relationship between words and images, developing a story, thumbnails and book dummies, steps to finding an agent and publication, joining critique groups and professional organizations. A portion of each class, except the first, will be devoted to sharing and critiquing student projects. 

    Instructor: Jennifer K. Mann is a picture book author and illustrator from Bainbridge Island. Formerly an architect, she gleefully turned to picture books full-time in 2012. She is the author and illustrator of Two Speckled Eggs, I Will Never Get a Star on Mrs. Benson’s Blackboard, Sam and Jump, and the forthcoming Josie’s Lost Tooth, all published by Candlewick Press. She is the illustrator of George Shannon’s Turkey Tot, and Alison McGhee’s Percy, Dog of Destiny.

     
    • Saturday, May 05, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code--WR0518JJ
    • 11
    Register

    You spent months, perhaps years, writing, revising, editing and polishing your novel or memoir. Your goal is to see it in bookstores and in the hands of readers. If you choose to pursue the traditional publishing road, this means having that manuscript accepted by a literary agent, or the editor of a small press. Your calling card is your query letter. You have one page—four or five paragraphs, four-hundred words—to sell your book, convey your voice, state your credentials, and make the case why, out of the hundreds of queries an agent receives each year, your story is one of the few she should represent.

    This workshop will examine each element of a stand-alone query letter, with particular emphasis on crafting your book’s “hook." We’ll also discuss how to find agents to query, and how the query and pitch processes works, but most of our time will be spent crafting your query letter. Even if your book is in the earliest stages—a first draft, an outline or collection of research notes—working on a query letter is an excellent way to articulate what you are writing about, who your readers are, and what sets your story apart from the rest.

    Participants will have time to work separately on each section of their query letter in class and have the opportunity to receive feedback if they choose to share portions of their query with the group. The bulk of workshop time will be spent on the “meat” of the query: the hook. The goal is for each participant to leave with a working query that they can hone and polish as they plan their submission process.

    *This workshop will focus on works of fiction and memoir; narrative nonfiction queries are usually accompanied by substantive proposals, which are animals of a different sort. But non-fiction writers are encouraged to participate; the basic principles and sources of information hold true for any one-page query letter, which all writers will be expected to present.

    Instructor: Julie Christine Johnson is the award-winning author of the novels In Another Life (Sourcebooks, 2016) and The Crows of Beara (Ashland Creek Press, 2017). Her short stories and essays have appeared in several journals, including Emerge Literary Journal; Mud Season Review; Cirque: A Literary Journal of the North Pacific Rim; Cobalt; River Poets Journal, in the print anthologies Stories for Sendai; Up, Do: Flash Fiction by Women Writers; and Three Minus One: Stories of Love and Loss; and featured on the flash fiction podcast No Extra Words. She holds undergraduate degrees in French and Psychology and a Master’s in International Affairs. Julie leads writing workshops and seminars and offers story/developmental editing and writer coaching services. 

    A hiker, yogi, and wine geek, Julie makes her home on the Olympic Peninsula of northwest Washington state. 

    • Thursday, May 24, 2018
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code WR0524MS
    • 8
    Register

    "BARN  Gathering” --Authors’ Reading--In Lieu of Roundtable

    In the spirit of Gertrude Stein, BARN Writers and Martha Salinas will be hosting a salon for members and non-members to read their work to an appreciative audience. This is a great opportunity to prepare for your debut as an author. Even if you’ve read at your own book signings before, this is a wonderful chance to reach new readers. Beginners and experienced writers alike are welcome. 

    There will be room for ten readers and two guests who don’t read. Each reading will be five minutes with two short breaks. Please sign up early. 

    • Saturday, May 26, 2018
    • 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR0518HJ
    • 11
    Register

    If you are interested in publishing a simple book (fiction, memoir, art, or otherwise) without hiring a publisher or someone for formatting, this is the beginners’ class for you.

    Award winning author H. M. (Hannah) Jones has self- and indie-published over 13 books, both with and without graphics, over the last five years through her imprints HMJ Books and Madame Geek Publications.   She has made a study of basic formatting in order to bring professional, clean books to her readers for little to no monetary formatting costs to herself. 

    H.M. will discuss paperback formatting tips in Word and how to utilize some of the basic features of Word to make sure ebook software displays your words and pictures correctly. She will also share with you some free to cheap, easy to use photo editing tools that come in handy when creating books with graphics. She has gone through the frustrating experience of having a non-transferable file with strange spacing and badly placed photography. She can share with you what parts of a book ebook software finds difficult to translate and help you learn to navigate or avoid those pitfalls.

    If you are interested in utilizing the ebook aspect of publishing, you will leave the class with a solid understanding of how to format a readable PDF for a professional paperback book. 

    Instructor:  H.M. Jones is the author of the award-winning dark fantasy, Monochrome, and its prequel, Fade to Blue. Her work is strewn across various short story anthologies, websites and poetry anthologies. She began her publishing journey in 2011, by self-publishing Monochrome, learning to format books and engage readers through intense study. She was successful enough in her pursuit that she engaged a publisher, who picked Monochrome up in 2015. She has since self-published several short novellas, two of which are graphic novellas. She owns her own indie-publishing house, Madame Geek Publications, and spends much of her "spare" time giving talks at conventions, when she is not teaching college English, Computers, mothering her children or writing books. Her website is www.hmjones.net, and she can be found tweeting around the twittersphere @HMJoneswrites. 

    • Saturday, June 02, 2018
    • Saturday, June 16, 2018
    • 3 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code-WR0618PL
    • 9
    Register

    It is remarkable how certain habits of life and work are common to world-class creators of the past and present—from painter to writer to composer  to photographer. Priscilla Long, poet, master teacher, and  author of the book Minding the Muse will lead this three- Saturday class in which we review these habits and  strategies and do writing exercises and a few assignments  to explore ways of bringing more of them into our own  creative process, whether we are just starting out or an  experienced artist or writer.     

    Rollo May said, "What if imagination and art are not frosting at all, but the fountainhead of human experience?" This three-Saturday course intends to nurture that fountainhead of human experience and to provide tools to help anyone's creativity flourish. Bring a notebook to write in and the required text: Minding the Muse: A Handbook for Painters, Composers, Writers, and Other Creators.

    Instructor: Priscilla Long is a Seattle-based writer of poetry, creative nonfiction, science, fiction, and history, and is a long-time independent teacher of writing. Her work appears widely and her five books are: Fire and Stone: Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? (University of Georgia Press), Minding the Muse: A Handbook for Painters, Poets, and Other Creators (Coffeetown Press), and Crossing Over: Poems (University of New Mexico Press). Her how-to-write guide is The Writer's Portable Mentor: A Guide to Art, Craft, and the Writing Life . She is also author of Where the Sun Never Shines: A History of America's Bloody Coal Industry. Her awards include a National Magazine Award. Her science column, Science Frictions, ran for 92 weeks in The American Scholar. She earned an MFA from the University of Washington and serves as Founding and Consulting Editor of www.historylink.org, the online encyclopedia of Washington state history. She grew up on a dairy farm on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

    • Saturday, June 23, 2018
    • 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code-WR0618SP
    • 12
    Register

    Across cultures and literary history, the literary arts have had a longstanding connection to visual culture. In this class, we’ll look at various examples of the ways in which literary and visual artists have approached bringing text and image together – we’ll look at ekphrastic poetry, visual artists using text, and literary authors using image and visual forms to innovate their work.  We’ll focus primarily on creative strategies to generate your own ideas for writing and try out a variety of writing exercises. 

    Bring a laptop or notebook to take notes and use for exercises. We’ll meet for one, three-hour session and explore a range of exercises and creative strategies. This class is for beginning and intermediate writers. 

    Instructor: Shin Yu Pai holds a Masters of Fine Arts from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and writes poetry and personal essays, in addition to making work as a visual artist.  From 2015-2017, she served as the fourth Poet Laureate for the City of Redmond. Her work has been awarded grants from the Awesome Foundation, Artist Trust, 4Culture, and the City of Seattle’s Office of Arts & Culture. Her latest book Same Cloth will be published by Entre Rios Books in Fall 2018. She lives with her husband and 4-year-old son in Seattle, where she serves as Deputy Head of the Obscura Society for Atlas Obscura and curates programs that inspire curiosity and wonder for the Seattle Obscura Society. 

    • Thursday, June 28, 2018
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code WR0628TS
    • 15
    Register

    Information to follow.

    • Wednesday, July 18, 2018
    • Wednesday, July 25, 2018
    • 2 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code-WR0718PS
    • 12
    Register

    Teens! Teens! Teens!

    Two days. One Essay. No Sweat.  

    Think it can’t be done? I disagree. I know college essays can be intimidating, but once you drill down past what a college essay isn’t and understand what it is, the rest is easy.  I’ll show you how to go from blank page to finished draft in less than a week.  You’ll discover powerful tools to help you brainstorm, craft, analyze, and edit your essay. Together, we’ll find a meaningful topic and story structure to help you stand out from the pack. You’ll have time to write, edit, and polish to ensure admission has the chance to see the best in you.

    Get real.  Get messy.  Get it done.

    Instructor: Pam Shor is Executive Director and Essay-Mentor-In-Chief - College Advisory Service.

    I love colleges and I love working with students. I've mentored students who've gone on to Ivy League Universities and students who've discovered their voice at less well-known, but still awesome, institutions. Helping each student find just the right fit and guiding them through the application process is at the heart of what I do. While essays can be particularly challenging, years of experience have taught me that every student has an inspiring story to tell. One of the great joys of my job is helping students discover those stories and present them well. 

    Prior to working with inspired and amazing college-bound students, I developed educational, multimedia software for Microsoft, including the award-winning Dinosaurs. Go ahead, ask me about T-Rex or the dreaded Velociraptor. I can go head to head with (almost) any 8-year-old. I also produced programming for KING-TV. My projects included documentaries, children’s programming, and an occasional stint with Almost Live! Early in my career, I worked with gifted students through the School of Education at the University of Virginia. I graduated from Kenyon College with a Bachelor of Science degree and I would go back in a heartbeat. I received my Educational Consulting Certificate from the University of California, Irvine.

      

    • Thursday, July 26, 2018
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code WR0726TS
    • 15
    Register

    Let's just get together and talk. Share your latest writing projects, problems, and ideas. Are you writing children's literature? Join Mary Sloat and Bridgett Wonder as they share their experiences, problems, and questions as they write for young people. Talk about your own experiences as you think about writing for younger audiences, as you are in the midst of writing a book for children, or as you have finished a book.

    Sometimes it's pleasant or cathartic to get together with other writers or prospective writers and  share. There is no better place to do that than a monthly roundtable. Register now for this BARN Writers' Forum.

    • Wednesday, August 01, 2018
    • Wednesday, November 21, 2018
    • 8 sessions
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code WR0818TS
    • 11
    Register

    In this Production Series class, you will be challenged to write a 60,000 word novel in four months. Topics to be covered when you meet on the first and third Wednesdays of each month during that time include the following: (1) the premise, the opening, time management, and how to participate in a response group; (2) character development and your story as a series of events; (3) plot, the story arc, and genre tropes;  (4) dialogue; (5) point of view and setting; (6) show don’t tell; (7) self-editing; (8) revision and manuscript preparation.

    Your commitment:  

    • Write, at least 5 days per week for 4 months
    • Write, at least, 750 words or 3 pages per day
    • Bring selections from your novel to class to work on and share with your response group
    •  Be an active, productive member of your response group

    Before the first class, you will submit the premise for your novel to the instructor. Instructions will be emailed on the formula for a premise. Student premises will be discussed and refined during the first class.

    InstructorT.M. Smith has loved to write since childhood, and it is little wonder that she majored in English in undergraduate school and went on to earn a Master of Arts in the same subject, accumulating more than one hundred credits in writing and literature courses while on that journey. Putting her schooling to good use, she taught her favorite subject at high school, community college, and university. During that busy time, like Virginia Woolf’s character in Between the Acts, she produced “orts, scraps, and fragments” that she now returns to and uses in her writings--a novel, Affection for Crime; two recently finished short stories; and a soon-to-be-completed novel series.

    She takes great joy in writing but a greater joy in sharing what she knows, thereby encouraging others to pursue their dreams and become authors.

    In her previous life, she earned a doctorate in Educational Administration and Higher Education; as principal she was honored when her school received the highly-sought-after National Secondary School Recognition Award (Blue Ribbon School); and she was excited to receive a Milken Outstanding Educator Award.

    • Monday, August 06, 2018
    • Friday, August 10, 2018
    • 5 sessions
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code-WR0818EC
    • 12
    Register
    Teens! Teens! Teens!

    Have you ever had a secret place? A hideout? A hut? A place that was your own special place? For many writers, a personal journal provides that same sense of privacy and freedom. It’s a place to be alone with your thoughts, to let your imagination run wild, and to explore the richness of your inner world. In this class, you will focus on writing as a means of self-discovery. Expect to keep a journal, which will be shared only voluntarily and to do a series of fun, imaginative activities combining art (working with clay, drawing, etc.) and writing.  Join us!!

    Both beginning and more experienced writers are welcome.    

    Instructor: Emily Chamberlain, M.A. is a professional educator with over twenty years of experience in both public and private schools. As a teacher of literature and writing at Carolina Friends School for much of her career, her greatest joy was to help young people use the writing process to weave deeper connections with themselves, each other, and the world around them. Emily holds a M.A. in Literature from Middlebury College’s Bread Loaf School of English and was an instructor at the Duke Young Writers’ Camp. In addition to teaching, she serves as a Courage & Renewal® facilitator, leading retreats designed to help participants live and work more fully and wholeheartedly, in alignment with who they truly are.

    • Saturday, August 25, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code-WR0818WK
    • 11
    Register

    Your life is a story, and if told correctly, a very interesting one. There is an art to taking the sprawling events of your life and reducing them down to a personal essay or memoir. Using Bill Kenower’s unique inside-out approach to writing, we will look at how to tell the fine difference between telling a story about your life, and using your life to tell a story. Students taking this class can expect to learn:

    • How to find the narrative arc in a personal story.
    • How to write about painful memories.
    • How to write about people who have mistreated you.
    • How to turn the most challenging moments from your life into a story that can help others.
    InstructorWilliam Kenower is the author of Fearless Writing: How to Create Boldly and Write With Confidence, and Write Within Yourself: An Author’s Companion, the Editor-in-Chief of Author magazine, and a sought-after speaker and teacher. In addition to his books he’s been published in The New York Times and Edible Seattle, and has been a featured blogger for the Huffington Post. His video interviews with hundreds of writers from Nora Ephron, to Amy Tan, to William Gibson are widely considered the best of their kind on the Internet. He also hosts the online radio program Author2Author where every week he and a different guest discuss the books we write and the lives we lead. 
    • Saturday, September 15, 2018
    • 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR0918BJ
    • 10
    Register

    Agents report that they’re flooded with more queries and proposals than ever before, even as publishers cut back the number of books they produce each year. How can you break through the noise and get your project noticed? This class will help you step back and see your fiction or nonfiction work through fresh eyes and a business-based perspective. We’ll identify the things that make your work unique, marketable, and irresistible to publishing gatekeepers, and then with lots of examples and time for practice and personal feedback, we’ll work on verbal “elevator pitches,” one-paragraph hooks (great for query letters), and the dreaded synopsis.

    Attendees will…

    1.     Be challenged to consider their work from a fresh, detached, commercial perspective.
    2.    Learn how to condense full-length fiction and nonfiction projects into industry-appropriate 1-2 page synopses, and how to identify the compelling “hooks” that make great verbal pitches and query letter descriptions.
    3.    Gain a realistic understanding of what publishers and agents are looking for in new authors, including author platform, compelling concept, and connection to existing popular trends.
    Instructor: Beth Jusino is a publishing consultant for both traditional and self-publishing authors, with almost twenty years of experience helping writers navigate the complicated space between manuscript and final book. A former literary agent and marketing director, she’s the author of the award-winning The Author's Guide to Marketing and has ghostwritten or collaborated on half a dozen additional titles. Beth is a member of the Northwest Independent Editors Guild, a regular speaker for Seattle Public Library’s #SeattleWrites workshops, and has taught at writers’ conferences across the country. Visit her online at www.bethjusino.com or on Twitter @bethjusino. 
    • Saturday, September 22, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, WR1218JJ
    • 6
    Register

    Whether you attended "The Art and Craft of the Query: Part 1, The Nuts and Bolts" in May or you have a draft of a query letter in need of review, this workshop will help you prepare the final draft. We’ll look at each query letter, assess its effectiveness and impact, and work together to sharpen the query’s essentials with particular emphasis on the pitch. 

    A maximum of only six students will participate in this class.

    Please bring a draft of your query letter to share. Your query should be fully-formed—we won’t be writing letters from scratch—but don’t worry if it’s rough. The goal of this workshop is to refine your query so it’s an irresistible call to action for a literary agent to represent your work.

    *This workshop will focus on works of fiction and memoir; narrative nonfiction queries are usually accompanied by substantive proposals, which are animals of a different sort. But non-fiction writers are encouraged to participate; the basic principles hold true for any one-page query letter, which all writers will be expected to present.

    Instructor: Julie Christine Johnson is the award-winning author of the novels In Another Life (Sourcebooks, 2016) and The Crows of Beara (Ashland Creek Press, 2017). Her short stories and essays have appeared in several journals, including Emerge Literary Journal; Mud Season Review; Cirque: A Literary Journal of the North Pacific Rim; Cobalt; River Poets Journal, in the print anthologies Stories for Sendai; Up, Do: Flash Fiction by Women Writers; and Three Minus One: Stories of Love and Loss; and featured on the flash fiction podcast No Extra Words. She holds undergraduate degrees in French and Psychology and a Master’s in International Affairs. Julie leads writing workshops and seminars and offers story/developmental editing and writer coaching services. 

    A hiker, yogi, and wine geek, Julie makes her home on the Olympic Peninsula of northwest Washington state. 

    • Thursday, September 27, 2018
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code WR0927MS
    • 12
    Register

    "BARN  Gathering” --Authors’ Reading--In Lieu of Roundtable

    In the spirit of Gertrude Stein, BARN Writers and Martha Salinas will be hosting a salon for members and non-members to read their work to an appreciative audience. This is a great opportunity to prepare for your debut as an author. Even if you’ve read at your own book signings before, this is a wonderful chance to reach new readers. Beginners and experienced writers alike are welcome. 

    There will be room for ten readers and two guests who don’t read. Each reading will be five minutes with two short breaks. Please sign up early. 

    • Thursday, October 25, 2018
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code WR1025TS
    • 15
    Register

    Information to follow.

    • Saturday, October 27, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code WR1018WR
    • 12
    Register

    Dialogue is crucial to any kind of story—fiction, nonfiction, any type of script. But dialog is more than simply writing down realistic conversation. In reality, no one wants to hear (or read) about the weather, or what someone had for lunch (unless it really matters!). 

    Uninteresting dialogue can sink a story like a hole in the hull, while good dialogue makes it sail along beautifully. Writing great dialogue is tricky. 

    In this class you’ll learn to write dialogue that sounds lifelike, yet is carefully constructed so every line mines character background, tension, emotion and intent. 

    Instructor: Warren Read is the author of a 2008 memoir, The Lyncher in Me (Borealis Books), and the 2017 novel, Ash Falls (Ig Publishing). His short fiction has been published in Hot Metal Bridge, Mud Season ReviewSliver of StoneInkletteSwitchback and The East Bay Review. He has been in education for 26 years and is currently an assistant principal with the Bainbridge Island School District.   

    • Saturday, November 03, 2018
    • 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR1118JL
    • 11
    Register

    In this class with Jennifer Longo, you will explore the various conventions found in contemporary young adult novels, focusing on working with and against these tropes to create a unique narrative that remains true to its audience. 

    YA novels, no matter the genre, nearly always feature many of the same recognizable characters and relationships, plotlines, and conflicts. New writers may not be familiar with (or fond of) some of these tropes. The authors may feel as if their books need to be shoved through a veritable sieve of conventions that have nothing to do with the narrative.

    You will explore ways to work with and around these, sometimes, irksome elements. During the last part of class, you will examine opening pages of YA-- how they grab and hold the reader and how they are free of conventions. Along with Jennifer Longo, discover how it is possible to create a story that remains true to your vision and yet captivating for the YA reader.

    Here’s a tip from the instructor and successful author: YA is written about, but not always for, a teen audience.

    Instructor: Jennifer Longo is a playwright and novelist with Random House Books. Her first two YA novels, Six Feet Over it and Up To This Pointe were both finalists for the Washington State Book Award. Jen holds a B.A. in Acting from San Francisco State University and an M.F.A. in Playwriting from Humboldt State University. Her next novel (Random House, Fall 2018) is set in her forever home, her best writing inspiration - the beautiful PNW.  

    • Thursday, November 15, 2018
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code WR0818TS
    • 15
    Register


    Let's just get together and talk. Share your latest writing projects, problems, and ideas. 

    Sometimes it's pleasant or cathartic to get together with other writers or prospective writers and  share. There is no better place to do that than a monthly roundtable. Register now for this BARN Writers' Colloquy.

    • Saturday, December 08, 2018
    • 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, WR1218JJ
    • 6
    Register

    Whether you attended "The Art and Craft of the Query: Part 1, The Nuts and Bolts" in May or you have a draft of a query letter in need of review, this workshop will help you prepare the final draft.We’ll look at each query letter, assess its effectiveness and impact, and work together to sharpen the query’s essentials with particular emphasis on the pitch.

    A maximum of only six students will participate in this class.

    Please bring a draft of your query letter to share. Your query should be fully-formed—we won’t be writing letters from scratch—but don’t worry if it’s rough. The goal of this workshop is to refine your query so it’s an irresistible call to action for a literary agent to represent your work.

    *This workshop will focus on works of fiction and memoir; narrative nonfiction queries are usually accompanied by substantive proposals, which are animals of a different sort. But non-fiction writers are encouraged to participate; the basic principles hold true for any one-page query letter, which all writers will be expected to present.

    Instructor: Julie Christine Johnson is the award-winning author of the novels In Another Life (Sourcebooks, 2016) and The Crows of Beara (Ashland Creek Press, 2017). Her short stories and essays have appeared in several journals, including Emerge Literary Journal; Mud Season Review; Cirque: A Literary Journal of the North Pacific Rim; Cobalt; River Poets Journal, in the print anthologies Stories for Sendai; Up, Do: Flash Fiction by Women Writers; and Three Minus One: Stories of Love and Loss; and featured on the flash fiction podcast No Extra Words. She holds undergraduate degrees in French and Psychology and a Master’s in International Affairs. Julie leads writing workshops and seminars and offers story/developmental editing and writer coaching services. 

    A hiker, yogi, and wine geek, Julie makes her home on the Olympic Peninsula of northwest Washington state. 

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