Writers' Classes

    • Thursday, February 14, 2019
    • Thursday, March 28, 2019
    • 7 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR032819AR+
    • 8
    Register

    Word Sprint is a weekly time to write in the company of others. We write for twenty-five minutes, take a break, repeat. We'll turn dedicated, focused time into two of the most productive hours of our week! 

    There will be no sharing or critique, only fast-paced, supportive productivity in the company of other writers. It will be fun, exciting, and might be the thing to help you finish (or start...) your manuscript. 

    This group is free for members and only $25 for non-members from January through March.

    Organizer: Genevieve Douglass Persen is a composer and writer.




    • Tuesday, February 19, 2019
    • Tuesday, March 26, 2019
    • 8 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR032619AR+
    • 7
    Register

    Word War is a weekly sprint writing meet-up, where participants will be timed for four twenty-five minute intervals, writing as many words as they can for as long as the timer is running, with short breaks in between. Word counts will be recorded, and we'll turn dedicated, focused time and light-hearted competition into two of the most productive hours of our week! 

    There will be no sharing or critique, only fast-paced, supportive-but-competitive productivity in the company of other writers. It will be fun, exciting, and might be the thing to help you finish (or start...) your manuscript. 

    This group is free for members and only $25 for non-members from January through March.

    Organizer: Amelia Ramsey is a graduate of The Evergreen State College where she studied modern Southern literature and an indie-published author of dozens of steamy romantic shorts, novellas, and novels. She writes and publishes on Amazon under two pseudonyms she's too embarrassed to share with anyone. She's currently working on her first non-romantic

    If you are a BARN member who is interested in joining, contact Amelia at amelia@whereikeep.info




    • Thursday, February 28, 2019
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • BARN, Great Room, Class Code WR022819SM
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    A memoir can be a story, a history, a comment on society or a combination. It can be instructive, amusing, heart-breaking or all three. In every case, however, it is personal - which explains its popularity, both for the writer and the reader.

    Our Roundtable on Memoir brings together three amazing writers who have different backgrounds, styles, and reasons for writing in this genre. It will be an interesting evening! 

    Panelist Bios: 

    Kathleen Alcala

    The idea of writing a memoir is terrifying to me. Why would I expose my naked soul to the public in a book?
    At the same time, most, if not all writing is a form of memoir, because we bring our experiences, our education, our cultural, and personal orientation to everything that we write. We are observers not only of the world around us, but of ourselves. 
    This is probably a good description of my collection of essays, “The Desert Remembers My Name.” My more recent book, The Deepest Roots: Finding Food and Community on a Pacific Northwest Island, is more sociological in nature. But I am part of the pack! Examining my own relationship with food and community as much as that of everyone else. 

    E.C. Murray

     E.C. Murray is the author of the memoir, A Long Way from Paris, named a KIRKUS Best Book of the Year. She traveled to Paris to be a writer, but instead was transformed herding goats in the mountains of Southern France. Her short story memoir, “The Urban Goatherd," garnered her a Pushcart nomination. A writing instructor at Seattle Central College and Tacoma Community College, her freelance articles range from Lady Gaga to Paralympics, from parenting to traveling. 

    With a Master’s degree and two writing certificates from the University of Washington, she founded and publishes The Writers Connection,www.writersconnection.org with writer resources and interviews with Elizabeth George, Debbie Macomber, Erik Larson, Garth Stein, and David Guterson and more. She also published Life Kind of Sucks, with tips for people feeling blue

    Warren Read

    While I'm primarily a fiction writer, my memoir, The Lyncher in Me, was published through Borealis Books in 2008. The memoir grew from the shocking discovery that my beloved great-grandfather served prison time for instigating a riot in 1920 Duluth, MN, a riot that led to the lynchings of three black men falsely accused of raping a white woman. The memoir served as a way to not only uncover and examine the story around this terrible event, but the story of my own family, and the aftershocks that this terrible secret had on the generations to follow.  

    I'm also the author of the 2017 novel, Ash Falls (Ig Publishing) and have had short fiction published in Hot Metal BridgeMud Season ReviewEast Bay Review and Switchbackmagazines, among others. In 2015, I earned my MFA from the Rainier Writing Workshop. Currently I'm an assistant principal on Bainbridge Island.

    • Saturday, March 02, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR030219WK
    • 4
    Register

    The personal essay is a unique blend of storytelling, lessons, and poetry. Not quite memoir, not quite self-help, it is a form that lends itself to blogs, essays for magazines, or opinions for newspapers. 

    In this workshop we’ll look at the structural foundation of the personal essay, as well as learn some simple tools to help authors use their life experiences as limitless source material. Most importantly, we’ll dig into how best to offer readers lessons without being dogmatic or obvious so that our essays can be both entertaining and inspiring.

    Bring a brown bag lunch.

    Instructor: William Kenower is the author of Fearless Writing: How to Create Boldly and Write With Confidence, andWrite Within Yourself: An Author’s Companion, the Editor-in-Chief of Authormagazine, and a sought-after speaker and teacher. In addition to his books he’s been published in The New York Timesand Edible Seattle, and has been a featured blogger for the Huffington Post. His video interviews with hundreds of writers from Nora Ephron, to Amy Tan, to William Gibson are widely considered the best of their kind on the Internet. He also hosts the online radio program Author2Author where every week he and a different guest discuss the books we write and the lives we lead. 


    • Saturday, March 09, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code-WR030919WR+
    • 5
    Register

    For this exciting and unusual class, join two instructors--one a writer and one an actress, one accustomed to breathing life into a character through words and one accustomed to taking the writer's words and giving them life.  

    Mining well-rounded and believable character is probably the most important element in fiction—every action and result will depend upon it. Developing unique and complex characters is a process of not only creation, but also of discovery. In this workshop the instructors will introduce a variety of activities that will help you do just this, thereby providing a toolbox that will take your fiction to new levels. By combining writing and acting exercises, you will give dimension to existing characters, develop new characters, and better view the world through the character’s point of view. Please wear comfortable clothes and bring a light lunch. Snacks and water will be provided.

    InstructorsWarren Read is the author of a 2008 memoir, The Lyncher in Me (Borealis Books), and the 2017 novel, Ash Falls (Ig Publishing). His short fiction has been published in Hot Metal Bridge, Mud Season ReviewSliver of StoneInkletteSwitchback and The East Bay Review. He has been in education for 26 years and is currently an assistant principal with the Bainbridge Island School District.

    Dinah Manoff is a Tony Award winning actress. She has starred in a number of television series, including the classic Soap. Manoff is best known for her portrayal as Carol Weston, the character she played for seven years on the series, Empty Nest, and for the memorable Pink Lady, Marty Maraschino in the film Grease. Other films include Ordinary People in which she co-starred opposite Timothy Hutton as Karen his suicidal best friend and I Oughta be in Pictures opposite Walter Matthau. Manoff has also worked as a television writer and director. She is the daughter of writer Arnold Manoff and Oscar winning actress Lee Grant. Currently, Manoff resides with her family on Bainbridge Island where she writes, coaches, and teaches acting with the Northwest Actors Lab.

     

    • Saturday, March 09, 2019
    • 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
    • BARN, Writers' Studio, Class Code WR030919BJ
    • 8
    Register

    Ready to take publishing into your own hands, but overwhelmed by all of the options and decisions involved? This class will walk you through the nitty-gritty decisions of the self-publishing process (without trying to sell you on any particular service or path). One size does not fit all when it comes to self publishing.

    Format decisions: should you have an e-book? A print book? Both? We’ll talk about:

    • Book formatting: tips and tricks for creating a clean, professional looking e-book and print design
    • The legalities: ISBNs, copyright registration, and more.
    • Cover design: Don’t try this at home. (Or if you’re a DIY artist, follow these guidelines.)
    • Cover Copy: The most important 200 words you’ll write as a self-publishing author


    We’ll also talk about when and how to hire freelancers, what research says about the best pricing strategies, and how to avoid the scams and pitfalls that trap self-publishing authors along the way. 

    Bring material to take notes (laptop, tablet, or notebook/pen).

    Instructor: 
    Beth Jusino is a publishing consultant for both traditional and self-publishing authors, with almost twenty years of experience helping writers navigate the complicated space between manuscript and final book. A former literary agent and marketing director, she’s the author of the award-winning The Author's Guide to Marketing and has ghostwritten or collaborated on half a dozen additional titles. Beth is a member of the Northwest Independent Editors Guild, a regular speaker for Seattle Public Library’s #SeattleWrites workshops, and has taught at writers’ conferences across the country. Visit her online at www.bethjusino.com or on Twitter @bethjusino. 



    Posted 8-18-18/tt/min6

    • Saturday, March 16, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR031619MC
    • 10
    Register

    Setting should be much more than the location where your novel takes place. At its best, setting establishes not only atmosphere and mood, but becomes a character on its own, and one woven so inextricably into the story that the reader cannot imagine it could be placed anywhere else.

    In this workshop, Megan Chance explains how to approach setting as an indispensable part of storytelling, how to utilize research, description, point of view, symbolism and word choice to create a setting as multilayered and integral to your novel as character or plot.


    M
    egan Chance is the bestselling, critically acclaimed, award-winning author of several novels. Her novels have been picks for Amazon Book of the Month, Borders Original Voices, and Booksense. Girlposse.com calls her a “writer of extraordinary talent. Megan Chance lives in the Pacific Northwest.


    • Saturday, March 23, 2019
    • Saturday, March 30, 2019
    • 2 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR032319K
    • 12
    Register

    New to playwriting or want to inject some energy into your ongoing writing practice? The Playwriting Lab is an opportunity to add more tools to your writing toolbox. We'll explore and experiment with the core fundamentals of playwriting and start developing scenes right away. Through a series of timed exercises and group games, we will create characters, write dialogue, and share our work out loud in a fast-paced, inclusive, safe, and fun environment. 


    Instructor’s bio

    Kristina Sutherland is a playwright, teaching artist, director, and actor based in Seattle. Kristina has over 15 years of professional teaching experience in the Puget Sound region and enjoys leading playwriting and collaborative play creation classes for students of all ages. Kristina created and led playwriting courses for adult learners at ACT Theatre, Seattle Repertory Theater, and Macha Monkey Productions, She has taught hundreds of beginning to advanced playwriting students since 2004.

    Kristina is also the author of several critically acclaimed plays including With DignityThebes and Franklin and Figaro. Her play Nancy, Frank, and Joe, co-written with Desiree Prewitt, was nominated for the Steinberg/ATCA New Play Award in 2010. Kristina’s plays have been produced in Seattle, Denver, Albuquerque, and across Canada in numerous fringe theatre festivals. Kristina received her Bachelor of Arts in Theatre from Western Washington University and her Master in Nonprofit Leadership from Seattle University.


    • Thursday, April 11, 2019
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR041119
    • 98
    Register

    Revolutionary landscape designer Piet Oudolf is known for designing public works like New York City’s popular High Line and the Lurie Garden in Chicago’s Millennium Park that redefine our conception of gardens as works of art in themselves.

    This gorgeous, meditative documentary immerses viewers in his work, taking us inside Oudolf’s creative process. From his aesthetic theories to his strikingly abstract sketches to the ecological implications of his ideas, the film poetically reveals how Oudolf upends conventional notions of nature, public space, and, ultimately, beauty itself.

    Details:

    • BARN Garden Arts and the Bloedel Reserve are co-hosting this inspirational film. We hope you can join us!
    • This is a free event for the community but please register so we know how many people to set up for.


    • Saturday, April 13, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR041319AC
    • 11
    Register

    Point-of-view can be defined as the narrative perspective from which a work is written. The types include first person, second person and third person. 

    As a writer, you'll use different perspectives depending on what type of work you are writing, as well as on what you're trying to do with it. In this class, we'll define each type of point-of-view, look at examples, and explore how each is useful and how each has drawbacks. 

    We’ll also be practicing using various points-of-view. So, bring a current work-in-progress with you to class, if you have one. If not, then that’s fine!

    InstructorAnne Clermont is the author of Learning to Fall, a novel which was a 2016 Foreword Indies Finalist in general fiction and received praise from Robert Goolrick, Ellen Sussman, Sonja Yoerg, Tracy Guzemen, and others. It was featured in Coastal Living, Redbook, Popsugar, Buzz Feed, SheKnows, Inside Chic, Brit+Co and more. Her work experience ranges from animal behavior to animal nutrition to cancer research, which has been published in a number of peer-reviewed scientific journals – including Nature Biotechnology. She currently divides her time between writing and working as an editor and website designer for her company, Bookish Media. You can learn more about her at www.anneclermont.com or www.bookish.media.


    • Thursday, April 25, 2019
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR042519STB+
    • 6
    Register

    You’ll get an overview of general aspects of law enforcement and it’s a great opportunity to ask questions that will shape an upcoming class on police practices for writers. 

    If you’re contemplating or writing a mystery, crime thriller, or other stories that involve a police presence, this is an excellent way to begin.  Sandra Terhune-Bickler and Steven Bickler bring a combined 51 years of police experience to this Roundtable so don’t miss it!

    Bios:

    Sandra Terhune-Bickler served with the Santa Monica Police Department for 28 years before retiring in September of 2014. Her last assignment with SMPD was Sergeant-In-Charge of the Resource Development Unit – Personnel and Training. Additionally, during her tenure with the SMPD, Dr. Terhune-Bickler was a member of the Crisis Negotiations Team both as a police officer and a sergeant for over 20 years. She was also a Motorcycle Traffic Enforcement Officer for six years. She also implemented and coordinated the SMPD’s Peer Support Program. She has a Master of Science degree in Counseling Psychology, and a Doctorate degree in Human and Organizational Systems. Dr. Terhune-Bickler frequently teaches law enforcement personnel on topics related to crisis negotiations and tactical communication strategies. Her article, “Too Close for Comfort: Negotiating with Fellow Officers” was published in FBI’s Law Enforcement Journal (2004). She recently presented at the Washington State Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Conference, and Kitsap County 40-hr law enforcement CIT Course. She resides on Bainbridge Island with her husband, Steve.

     

    Steven Bickler served with the Santa Monica Police Department for 23 years before retiring in September of 2014. He was a Field Training Officer, responsible for the training and evaluation of new officers on police field procedures including tactics, report writing and the law. He was assigned to the 3rd St Bicycle detail responsible for directed patrol of the downtown business district, engaging in community-oriented and neighborhood-centered policing and problem solving. He was Vice Chair of the Santa Monica Police Officer’s Association for approximately six years. He received a Life Saving Chief’s Commendation in 1997 for preventing a woman’s suicide. Additionally, he worked in the Chief’s office on crime analysis data integrity, and compliance with the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR). He and his wife, Sandy, now reside on Bainbridge Island, where he engages in “bite-sized” dessert baking, and fine art photography.



    • Sunday, April 28, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR042819LD
    • 11
    Register

    Pulitzer Prize-winning Neruda wrote odes to socks and artichokes. William Carlos Williams penned the infamous “The Red Wheelbarrow,” regarding not much more than a wheelbarrow and some chickens. Can we make our everyday lives into poems that surprise and delight? Can we celebrate the ordinary, allowing the small particulars we encounter infiltrate our poems? In this workshop, we will explore poets who have done just this. We will use their works as prompts to create our own songs of praise for the mundane details of our lives.

    Details:
    This is a beginner level class.


    Instructor: 
    Lauren Davis is the author of the chapbook Each Wild Thing’s Consent (Poetry Wolf Press). She holds an MFA from the Bennington Writing Seminars, and her poetry and essays can be found in publications such as Prairie SchoonerSpillwayEmpty Mirror, and Lunch Ticket. Davis teaches at The Writers’ Workshoppe in Port Townsend, WA, and she works as an editor at The Tishman Review.



    Posted 11-29/M6/tt

    • Saturday, May 04, 2019
    • Saturday, May 11, 2019
    • 2 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR050419AG
    • 12
    Register

    The publishing world has changed dramatically with the eruption of the digital economy and social media networks. In today’s world, publishers and agents demand not only high-quality content but a digital presence for authors in order to publish their creation.

    In this two-session Saturday class, Antonio Garcia will introduce the basic concepts of digital marketing and social media marketing to build an online presence for writers. The classes will cover the differences between a website and a blog, basic concepts of SEO (search engine optimization), social media strategy and content marketing. 

    Bring your laptop, smartphone and notepad and start or continue growing your digital presence to get website traffic, followers and likes and to increase your chances of grabbing the attention of publishers and agents.

    InstructorAntonio Garcia is a brand strategist and art director who started his career in advertising and marketing 15 years ago in Madrid (Spain). Since then he has worked in London (United Kingdom), Portland and now the Greater Seattle Area. He has worked for advertising agencies, start-ups, non-profit organizations, educational institutions and as a freelance consultant.


    • Thursday, May 23, 2019
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR052319MS
    • 12
    Register

    "BARN  Gathering” --Authors’ Reading--In Lieu of Roundtable

    In the spirit of Gertrude Stein, BARN Writers and Martha Salinas will be hosting a salon for members and non-members to read their work to an appreciative audience. This is a great opportunity to prepare for your debut as an author. Even if you’ve read at your own book signings before, this is a wonderful chance to reach new readers. Beginners and experienced writers alike are welcome. 

    There will be room for ten readers and two guests who don’t read. Each reading will be five minutes with two short breaks. Please sign up early. 



    • Saturday, June 01, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
    • BARN GREAT ROOM, Class Code: WR060119DM
    • 65
    Register

    The emotional effect of fiction on readers is a craft.  Based on psychological research and study of what makes novels emotionally gripping, this intensive workshop takes participants beyond showing or telling to create an emotional journey for readers—one unseen but nevertheless deeply felt and ultimately unforgettable.  

    While writers might disagree over showing versus telling or plotting versus pantsing, none would argue this: if you want to write strong fiction, you must make your readers feel. The reader's experience must be an emotional journey of its own, one as involving as your characters' struggles, discoveries, and triumphs are for you.

    That's where The Emotional Craft of Fiction comes in. In his book, veteran literary agent and expert fiction instructor Donald Maass shows you how to use story to provoke a visceral and emotional experience in readers. Topics covered include:

    • emotional modes of writing
    • beyond showing versus telling
    • your story's emotional world
    • moral stakes
    • connecting the inner and outer journeys
    • plot as emotional opportunities
    • invoking higher emotions, symbols, and emotional language
    • cascading change
    • story as emotional mirror
    • positive spirit and magnanimous writing
    • the hidden current that makes stories move

    This is an intensive, hands-on workshop for fiction writers.  Participants should bring a WIP and writing materials.

    Presenter bio: A literary agent in New York, Donald Maass’s agency sells more than 150 novels every year to major publishers in the U.S. and overseas.  He is the author of The Career Novelist (1996), Writing the Breakout Novel (2001), Writing the Breakout Novel Workbook(2004) and The Fire in Fiction (2009), Writing 21stCentury Fiction (2012) and The Emotional Craft of Fiction (2016).  He is a past president of the Association of Authors’ Representatives, Inc.

    • Saturday, June 08, 2019
    • Sunday, June 09, 2019
    • 2 sessions
    • BARN Book Arts Studio, Class Code BO060819JM+
    • 8
    Register

    During this weekend class you will expand and deepen your learning from the Books Meet Writing in the Natural World class (offered in April 2019 and September 2018). The book form you will create is called a blizzard book, originally invented by Hedi Kyle.  This book structure allows for insertion of completed pages after the binding is completed. This is ideal for adding polished writing, and decorated pages, as you are inspired. You will be guided through simple, outdoor, creative, nature-based, and writing activities aimed to feed your inspiration, and to tantalize your muse. Please bring a willingness (and weather-appropriate gear) to go outside – rain or shine – to engage these activities. Leave class with a beautiful and writing-filled book that makes you proud. 

    Materials: All materials will be provided.  There is a materials fee of $10 added to your class fee during reservation.

    Skill Level: The first class in this series is a prerequisite for this second class. If you have not taken the first class, and still wish to sign up for this one, please contact the instructors. 

    Ages: Ages 14+ welcome.

    Please bring a bag lunch. We have a refrigerator for people to store their lunches and drinks!

    Instructor Bio:

    Jennifer J. Wilhoit, Ph.D. is an author, mentor, editor, and spiritual ecologist who has been researching the connection between creativity and nature for over two decades. Through her practice, TEALarbor stories, Jennifer works individually with writers of many genres from all over the world; offers workshops, training, courses, and retreats to diverse audiences; and presents her work frequently at professional conferences. Jennifer has published three nonfiction books including Writing on the Landscape: Essays and Practices to Write, Roam, Renew (2017); dozens of articles, book chapters, essays, newspaper articles, and guest blogs. She’s currently working on her next book, scheduled for release later this year.  Please visit her web site at www.tealarborstories.com

    Mary Jeanne (MJ) Linford has been a professional book artist for over 20 years, under the press name Bad Girl Press (badgirlpress.com). Learning both by doing and also studying with Hazel Koenig at the University of Washington, she specializes in pop-up books and unusual bindings, as well as traditional binding styles. She also works with three other women under the press name Full Plate Press. Her books are in selected museums, libraries and collections nationwide, and can be seen in the book arts room at Bainbridge Island Museum of Art.


    • Saturday, June 22, 2019
    • 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR062219BJ
    • 12
    Register

    This workshop takes an unbiased and unvarnished look at a modern writer’s publishing options, from “Big 5” traditional publishers to small presses to self publishing (with or without the support of service companies) to “hybrid” and other emerging models. Taught by a publishing professional who works on and appreciates both sides of the fence, this class gets past the hype and examines pros and cons of each choice, realistic costs and income potential, as well as scams and pitfalls to avoid. Most importantly, it helps writers seeking publication understand their own goals, strengths, and how to make a decision that's best for them.

    Attendees will…

    1. Be able to identify the broad range of choices available for publishing: big presses, small presses, independent self publishing, subsidy and “author assisted” presses, and emerging models. 
    2. Gain a realistic impression of the costs, timing, and logistics involved in producing a book. 
    3. Have clear guidelines (a checklist of questions) to help them consider the best options for their specific situation.

    Instructor: 
    Beth Jusino is a publishing consultant for both traditional and self-publishing authors, with almost twenty years of experience helping writers navigate the complicated space between manuscript and final book. A former literary agent and marketing director, she’s the author of the award-winning The Author's Guide to Marketing and has ghostwritten or collaborated on half a dozen additional titles. Beth is a member of the Northwest Independent Editors Guild, a regular speaker for Seattle Public Library’s #SeattleWrites workshops, and has taught at writers’ conferences across the country. Visit her online at www.bethjusino.com or on Twitter @bethjusino. 



    Posted 8-18-18/tt/min6

    • Saturday, July 13, 2019
    • 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR071319STB+
    • 12
    Register

    This team-taught, interactive course offers a comprehensive introduction to general aspects of law enforcement for writers to enhance their understanding and portrayal of police practices in their writing


    Instructors:

    Sandra Terhune-Bickler served with the Santa Monica Police Department for 28 years before retiring in September of 2014. Her last assignment with SMPD was Sergeant-In-Charge of the Resource Development Unit – Personnel and Training. Additionally, during her tenure with the SMPD, Dr. Terhune-Bickler was a member of the Crisis Negotiations Team both as a police officer and a sergeant for over 20 years. She was also a Motorcycle Traffic Enforcement Officer for six years. She also implemented and coordinated the SMPD’s Peer Support Program. She has a Master of Science degree in Counseling Psychology, and a Doctorate degree in Human and Organizational Systems. Dr. Terhune-Bickler frequently teaches law enforcement personnel on topics related to crisis negotiations and tactical communication strategies. Her article, “Too Close for Comfort: Negotiating with Fellow Officers” was published in FBI’s Law Enforcement Journal (2004). She recently presented at the Washington State Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Conference, and Kitsap County 40-hr law enforcement CIT Course. She resides on Bainbridge Island with her husband, Steve.

     

    Steven Bickler served with the Santa Monica Police Department for 23 years before retiring in September of 2014. He was a Field Training Officer, responsible for the training and evaluation of new officers on police field procedures including tactics, report writing and the law. He was assigned to the 3rd St Bicycle detail responsible for directed patrol of the downtown business district, engaging in community-oriented and neighborhood-centered policing and problem solving. He was Vice Chair of the Santa Monica Police Officer’s Association for approximately six years. He received a Life Saving Chief’s Commendation in 1997 for preventing a woman’s suicide. Additionally, he worked in the Chief’s office on crime analysis data integrity, and compliance with the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR). He and his wife, Sandy, now reside on Bainbridge Island, where he engages in “bite-sized” dessert baking, and fine art photography.



    • Wednesday, September 18, 2019
    • Wednesday, October 23, 2019
    • 6 sessions
    • Writers' Studio, BARN, Class Code: WR091819KA
    • 12
    Register

    This six-week course will focus on shaping research, family stories, and other source materials into a form that will appeal to a contemporary reader. We will focus on the emotional development of your characters, as well as setting, scene, and dialogue, to bring fresh language to situations and characters. Sensory detail draws the reader into the story, but we must also empathize with the characters and fully inhabit their worlds. One of the most successful genres in both commercial and literary publishing today, readers of all ages find a well-imagined historical novel irresistible.

    We will end by discussing how to approach an agent or editor, cover letters, the synopsis, and possible markets. 

    Instructor: Kathleen Alcalá’s trilogy on nineteenth century Mexico was published by Chronicle Books: Spirits of the Ordinary, The Flower in the Skull, and Treasures in Heaven. Her work has received the Western States Book Award, the Governor's Writers Award, a Pacific Northwest Bookseller's Award, and a Washington State Book Award. A co-founder and contributing editor to The Raven Chronicles, Kathleen has been a writer in residence at Richard Hugo House and was permanent faculty in the Northwest Institute of Literary Arts MFA Program on Whidbey Island. Kathleen is also the author of a short story collection, Mrs. Vargas and the Dead NaturalistThe Desert Remembers My Name, essays on family and writing, and most recently, The Deepest Roots: Finding Food and Community on a Pacific Northwest Island from the University of Washington Press.

    • Saturday, October 12, 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR101219JB
    • 11
    Register

    This generative class is perfect for anyone who wishes to study the craft of writing-from-life. Students will learn basic skills used to create literary nonfiction, as well as the craft fundamentals used: tension, chronology, vivid description, pacing, and point-of-view. 

    Whether you’re writing a full memoir, a personal essay, or have never written before, this class is for you. Throughout the session, students can expect a combination of lectures, in-class writing exercises, short reading activities, and informal discussion.

    All levels welcome.

    Bring to class:  An excerpt of an autobiographical work-in-progress and/or an object that has sentimental value.

    Instructor Bio:
    Janee Baugher is the author of Coördinates of Yes (Ahadada Books) and The Body’s Physics (Tebot Bach), and she holds an MFA from Eastern Washington University. Her creative writing has been published in over 100 literary journals, including Tin House, The Southern Review, The American Journal of Poetry, Nimrod International Journal of Prose and Poetry, Boulevard, Nano Fiction, and The Writer’s Chronicle. Since 1999 Baugher has taught creative writing in primary and secondary schools, at arts camps and libraries, and at colleges and universities. Additionally, she’s held editorial positions at several journals, including Willow Springs, Switched-on Gutenberg, and StringTown, and she’s currently a poetry reader for Boulevard. To learn more about Janee Baugher see: http://JaneeJBaugher.wordpress.com

    • Wednesday, October 30, 2019
    • Wednesday, November 20, 2019
    • 4 sessions
    • Writers' Room, BARN, WR103019WR
    • 12
    Register

    It’s time to take your writing seriously. Warren Read—writer, educator, and published author—will guide you through every step of writing a short story in this four-session workshop. 

    The class will cover what makes a short story, character development, setting, dialogue, and point of view. Each session will include writing advice, fluency prompts, sharing your work with class members, and writing groups/workshopping. Between meetings, you will focus on developing your short story.

    All levels of writers are welcome. You might dust off an old story you began years ago, come to class with an idea for a story, or attend the first session with no clue what you want to write. It’s all okay because the first class will begin with brainstorming activities. You’ll leave with a clear direction in mind.

    Warren Read will use excerpts and ideas from Ron Carlson Writes a Story. You are encouraged to get a copy from the library, Amazon, Kindle, iBooks, and others.     

    Instructor Bio: Warren Read is the author of a memoir, The Lyncher in Me (2009, Borealis Books) and the novel, Ash Falls (2017, Ig Publishing). His fiction has appeared in Hot Metal Bridge, Mud Season Review, Sliver of Stone, Inklette, Switchback Magazine and the Christmas issue of East Bay Review. He is an assistant principal in Bainbridge Island, WA; in 2015 he received his MFA in from the Rainier Writing Workshop at Pacific Lutheran University. Learn more about Warren at www.warren-read.com.


    • Saturday, November 02, 2019
    • Saturday, November 16, 2019
    • 2 sessions
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR110219MB
    • 12
    Register

    So you want to write a novel? Or you’ve written 40,000 words of a novel, and suddenly find yourself stuck. Or your stories are interesting but lack a real plot.

    Michele Bacon is here to help. Over the course of two Saturdays, she’ll put you to work on developing a compelling protagonist, raising the stakes, and plotting your manuscript. Come with a full story idea or with only a desire to write a novel. You’ll leave with clear direction and a plot waiting to become a manuscript.

    The two sessions will include brief lectures, hands-on workshops, one-on-one discussion with Michele, and some partner work with other students.

    Please feel free to bring a lunch. BARN has a refrigerator to store your lunch in.

    Instructor

    Michele Bacon is the author of contemporary young adult novels Antipodes and Life Before.  Her work focuses on families, friends, and the complicated relationships therein. When she’s not writing, Michele loves skiing, playing tabletop games, traveling, and dreaming of travel. She’s visited all 50 states and dozens of countries, always eager to hear people’s stories and immerse herself in other cultures. Wherever she goes, Michele enjoys helping writers find their voices and tell their stories. And she loves coming home to Seattle, where she lives with her partner and three young children.



    • Thursday, November 21, 2019
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • BARN Writers' Studio, Class Code: WR112119MS
    • 12
    Register

    "BARN  Gathering” --Authors’ Reading--In Lieu of Roundtable

    In the spirit of Gertrude Stein, BARN Writers and Martha Salinas will be hosting a salon for members and non-members to read their work to an appreciative audience. This is a great opportunity to prepare for your debut as an author. Even if you’ve read at your own book signings before, this is a wonderful chance to reach new readers. Beginners and experienced writers alike are welcome. 

    There will be room for ten readers and two guests who don’t read. Each reading will be five minutes with two short breaks. Please sign up early. 



    • Saturday, November 23, 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • BARN Wide - All Studios and All Floors

    BARN Bazaar begins for public at 10 am to 3:00 pm 

    More information to be posted in October.

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