Fiber Arts & related upcoming events

    • Wednesday, July 12, 2017
    • Wednesday, July 26, 2017
    • 3 sessions
    • Fiber Studio at BARN 8890 Three Tree Lane, Bainbridge Island
    • 4

    Ever wanted to learn to knit? Well, this is your chance. Learn with experienced knitting instructor Laura Alonso. Once you are done you will be able to cast on, knit, purl, and bind off.  

    What to bring: 1 skein worsted weight yarn, such as Cascade 220 or Manos Maxima, size 8 needles (24” circular or 10” straight)

    Contact information: Marcy Lynn lynn.marcy@gmail.com


    • Monday, July 24, 2017
    • Friday, July 28, 2017
    • 5 sessions
    • BARN Book Arts, Printmaking & Fiber Studios, 8890 Three Tree Lane, BI WA 98110
    • 0

    Sorry, but this event is now sold out. You can join the waitlist and we will send you an email when additional spaces become available.

    Join waitlist

    Express Yourself: Personalize a book creation, design an art print and learn to up-cycle your wardrobe in Project Runway with simple sewing techniques. 

    This is a full week immersion experience at BARN, you will be here all day, learn basic skills in the Glass Arts, Jewelry/Fine Metals and Woodshop, cook your own lunch with the Kitchen Arts and become a BARN teen!

    Studios: Book, Print and Fiber Arts  

    Ages: 13- 18

    Additional material fee needed on the first day of class: $50Please have student bring check or cash to the first day of class.

    Click below for more Teen Camps: 


    July 31 - August 4 
    Triple Treat, Jewelry, Glass, and Wood: Teen Camp at BARN  

    August 7 - 11 Outdoor Fun: Make an Adirondack chair, metal stars, glass mobile and a small planter


     

    • Wednesday, July 26, 2017
    • Wednesday, August 23, 2017
    • 5 sessions
    • Fiber Arts Studio, 8890 Three Tree Lane, Bainbridge Island
    • 6

    This class will guide you through your project week by week. A first sweater (baby sweaters are great because they are small and can be completed in the five week time frame), a baby blanket, poncho or a cowl. You will try challenging new projects and see it through with support each week. 

    You will learn new skills and be able to see and fix mistakes, taking your knitting to the next level and be part of a community of knitters, sharing stories and adventures. 

    Level: This is a mid level class open to ages 14 and above.  You need to know how to knit, purl, cast on and bind off.

    Instructor:  Laura has taught knitting classes at Churchmouse Yarns & Teas for the last ten years.  Those classes have included how to knit hats, sweaters, mittens, Laura especially likes teaching learn to knit classes.  Being able to open a new world of creativity to people through knitting is pure joy for her.  

    “I always have a knitting project with me in the car, beside my chair, visiting with friends, I have different projects for different situations, concentration needed so no conversation and projects I can keep my hands busy and engage in good conversation”.

    What to bring: Your pattern and yarns and needles for your desired project.

    For more information, contact  Marcy Lynn (lynn.marcy@gmail.com)


    • Thursday, August 03, 2017
    • Thursday, August 10, 2017
    • 2 sessions
    • BARN Fiber Arts Studio, 8890 Three Tree Land
    • 6

    In this class you will learn to knit in the round and use double pointed needles. These skills will launch you into a world of new possibilities, socks, cowls and more hats.  

    Level: You need to know how to knit and purl for this class. This class is open to 14 years and older

    Material to bring:  Churchmouse First Projects Ribbed Beanie and Handwarmers pattern, 115 yards of worsted weight yarn, size US 7 needles in double point and 16” formats, a darning needle and scissors.  The Churchmouse learn to Knit Companion booklet is a handy reference guide to get also, if you don’t have one.

    Contact for class, email:  Marcy Lynn

     lynn.marcy@gmail.com


    • Thursday, August 03, 2017
    • Thursday, August 17, 2017
    • 3 sessions
    • Fiber Studio at BARN 8890 Three Tree Lane, Bainbridge Island
    • 5

    Ever wanted to learn to knit? Well, this is your chance. Learn with experienced knitting instructor Laura Alonso. Once you are done you will be able to cast on, knit, purl, and bind off.  


    What to bring: 1 skein worsted weight yarn, such as Cascade 220 or Manos Maxima, size 8 needles (24” circular or 10” straight)

    Contact information: Marcy Lynn lynn.marcy@gmail.com


    • Friday, August 04, 2017
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Great Room - BARN - 8890 Three Tree Lane, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110
    • 100

    Polly Adams Sutton, whose work was chosen for the cover of the book, “500 Baskets”, will give a PowerPoint presentation of examples of her work which has helped to push the craft of Basketry into the realm of Fine Art.  

    Polly Adams Sutton Artist Statement:

    "The work begins when I have located a logging source where, with permission, I can harvest inner bark from the Western Red Cedar trees.  The outer bark is split off in the woods and I bring home several coils of fresh cedar bark.  After it dries and seasons, it is resealed, split and cut for the appropriate piece.  The ideal setting is when I can set the dried bark outside to be reconstituted in the rain.  This is the perfect way to begin to weave.

    There is no preconceived notion as to the purpose of my sculptural shapes. except perhaps, a quest for pleasing curvilinear forms.  I cut lengths of cedar with either big or small in mind.  Once the size of the base is determined and woven, the shape evolves as the work progresses.  I keep an eye on this evolution and try to control it with the use of tension in the material I am twining with, which is commonly wire.  The cedar bark, when damp, has an impact on the shaping as it is very pliable when soaked"

    This program is meant to cover background information for Polly Adams Sutton's Sculpture Weaving weekend workshop, but the greater community is most welcome. 

    Speaker Bio: Polly Adams Sutton is a full time studio artist, working with cedar bark to create sculptural baskets. Her educational background was art with an emphasis on painting and printmaking. Upon settling in the Pacific Northwest more than 35 years ago, she was introduced to basketry through the Seattle Weaver’s Guild. It has been her practicing art ever since. 

    She harvests cedar bark each spring in logging areas near Seattle, WA. Her sculptural work is primarily twined, although she experiments with wire as a woven element in her asymmetrical shapes. 

    She exhibits her work in galleries and museums nationwide. Sutton was awarded an artist project grant in 2012 through the City of Seattle to experiment with invasive vines in her work and received an Artist Trust GAP grant in 2012. This was used in conjunction with the Seattle Weavers Guild Grant for investigating the basketry of Sardinia. 

    • Saturday, August 05, 2017
    • Sunday, August 06, 2017
    • 2 sessions
    • Fiber Arts Studio, BARN, 8890 Three Tree Lane, BI, WA, 98110

    Create a unique, sculptural vessel made of sweet grass and cedar as Polly Adams Sutton shares her iunique sculptural weaving styles and uses of traditional and non-traditional materials. 

    This is an advanced workshop, where some prior experience with twining and cedar weaving will be helpful.  The pliability of Northwest Sweet Grass from the tidal flats of Washington, combined with the flexibility of Western Red Cedar gathered from local logging sites, will offer students an opportunity to create a unique vessel.  Sweet Grass twining will be the dominant technique.  Intermittently woven Bear Grass, skip stitches, and chase twining, will be introduced so students can create design and accents.  The focus will be on how to achieve an asymmetrical form through weaving and twining techniques. 

    Material fee: $95, payable by cash or check at the first session. There will be materials for more than one basket.

    Instructor: Polly Adams Sutton is a full-time studio artist, working with cedar bark to create sculptural baskets. Her educational background was art with an emphasis on painting and printmaking. Upon settling in the Pacific Northwest more than 35 years ago, she was introduced to basketry through the Seattle Weaver’s Guild. It has been her practicing art ever since. 

    She harvests cedar bark each spring in logging areas near Seattle, WA. Her sculptural work is primarily twined, although she experiments with wire as a woven element in her asymmetrical shapes. 

    She exhibits her work in galleries nationwide. Sutton was awarded an artist project grant in 2012 through the City of Seattle to experiment with invasive vines in her work and received an Artist Trust GAP grant in 2012. This was used inconjunction with the Seattle Weavers Guild Grant for investigating the basketry of Sardinia. Her work was chosen for the cover illustration of “500 Baskets.”

    • Saturday, August 05, 2017
    • Sunday, August 06, 2017
    • 2 sessions
    • BARN. 8890 Three Tree Lane
    • 9


    Fabric and the book form often marry to become stunning pieces of art. In this 2-day workshop, students will learn a variety of techniques to create images and embellish fabric that will be sewn together to make a simple and durable counting book for children or a sample book for the working fiber/book artist. Image-making techniques will include dying, painting, drawing, printing, stenciling, sewing, and digital transfer.  Instructor Lynn Agnew will walk us through a variety of sewn book techniques. Using buttons, embroidery thread, fabric scraps and other decorative techniques, participants will take home a sampler book of various techniques that can be utilized as a reference for making more ‘soft books’.  

    This is a great opportunity to work with both fabrics and books...  It's an opportunity not to be missed!

    Supply fee: $15

    Take Away: Students will take home a sampler book, plus ideas and instructions for making more.

    • Saturday, August 12, 2017
    • 9:00 AM - 3:30 PM
    • Fiber Arts Studio, 8890 Three Tree Lane, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110

    Create your own fabric with cyanotype, an old photographic process that produces blue and white images on cloth when exposed to the sun or other ultraviolet light source.

    The instructor, Sylvia Pippen, will also be teaching a one-day workshop where you can learn how to combine cyanotype with sashiko, a simple Japanese running stitch. (Register for that class here.) If you take both workshops you will  create the fabric design on the first day and combine it with sashiko on the second. Take away enough fabric to develop a quilt top or clothing and the skills to easily create your own fabric at home.

    The photograph shows one of Sylvia Pippen's fabric pieces combining cyanotype and sashiko.

    For cyanotype printing, you will use pretreated fabric.  Imagery such as leaves, paper silhouettes or designs drawn or printed on transparencies are placed on top of treated cotton fabric. The fabric is then exposed to ultraviolet light, rinsed and dried, revealing your design. Images can be very graphic or more muted by controlling exposure time and how much contact the imagery has with the cloth.

    Material Fees: $28 for 1 yd x 60” Kona Cotton treated with Cyanotype.  (Optional: You can order more treated fabric, including different colors, from www.blueprintsonfabric.com.)

    Students should bring the following to class:
    • A check or money order for $28 made out to Bainbridge Artisan Resource Network.
    • Sack lunch
    • Small sharp cloth and paper scissors
    • Ruler or tape measure
    • Mop up cloths (such as handi-wipes )
    • Gloves
    • Small-headed pins for pinning down botanicals to your boards
    • Several old towels to lay out your wet print
    • 1/4" - 1" foam boards that fit the dimensions of your glass; include a board at least 18" x 24". You can get a foam core board from an office supply store or you can use a piece of foam insulation.
    • Quilt batting to cover the foam boards (helps make better contact when under glass
    • Clear thin picture frame glass, non UV protected. Bring several sizes such as 12"x 12" for small experimental prints and larger glass approximately 12" x 18". Exact dimensions are not important! Please wrap the edges with electrical tape for safety. (There will be extra glass available for use)
    • Permanent magic markers to trace designs onto acetate sheets. (The acetate will be provided.)
    • Bring leaves, grasses or flowers. They can be fresh or pressed first. Look for feathery grasses, finely cut leaves such as Japanese maple, pine, spruce or cedar, or any herbaceous leaves of  poppy, columbine, bleeding heart, etc. that have interesting shapes.  If you have any paper silhouettes, feathers, doilies, or lace, bring them. Anything that is intricately cut works well.   

    Instructor: Sylvia Pippen  recently moved to La Conner, Washington after 13 years on Kauai and the Big Island of Hawaii. She has  been a gardener most of her life and quilting is an extension of her passion for plants. She loves to teach and travel. Her quilts combine hand appliqué with contemporary and traditional sashiko. She strives to create realistic appliquéd flowers and uses sashiko to outline intricate foliage designs. Her latest venture is cyanotype and surface design to create unique fabric.

    This is Sylvia's first time teaching at BARN



    • Sunday, August 13, 2017
    • 9:00 AM - 3:30 PM
    • Fiber Arts Studio, BARN, 8890 Three Tree Lane, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110
    Learn sashiko, a simple Japanese running stitch, that can be used to decorate fabric. The picture shows a sashiko art piece made by the instructor,  Sylvia Pippen.

    This class will cover sashiko techniques and applications using traditional and contemporary designs. Sylvia will also demonstrate her appliqué methods for easily forming appliqué shapes such as birds and flowers.  If you also took Sylvia's cyanotype workshop, you will find these appliqués complement your cyanotype fabrics. 

    By the end of the workshop you will have enough fabric to develop a quilt top.

    Material fee: $10 for a kit that includes white sashiko thread, sashiko needle, transfer paper, indigo cotton, packet of Sylvia’s favorite sashiko designs.

    Students should bring these to class: 

    • A check or money order for $10 made out to Bainbridge Artisan Resource Network.
    • A sack lunch 
    • A thimble if you use one
    • Thread conditioner such as Thread Heaven or beeswax (available in class)
    • White chalk marking pencil
    • Stylus or ball point pen for design transfer
    • Masking tape

    Optional: 1/2 yard or fat quarters of solid or mottled indigo blue cotton for sashiko.  Your kit includes fabric but you may want to have some from your own stash.

    Instructor:  Syliva Pippen recently moved to La Conner, Washington after 13 years on Kauai and the Big Island of Hawaii. She has been a gardener most of her  life and quilting is an extension of her passion for plants.She lovea to teach and travel to far flung places. Her  quilts combine hand appliqué, contemporary and traditional sashiko. She strives to create realistic appliquéd flowers and use sashiko to outline intricate foliage designs. Her latest venture is cyanotype and surface design to create unique fabric.

    • Friday, August 25, 2017
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • BARN: 8890 Three Tree Lane, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110
    • 117

    PUBLIC LECTURE: Weaving Nature – Plant Fiber Projects Blending Culture, Science & Art

    Melinda West


    This program is meant to cover background information for Melinda’s weekend workshop, but the greater community is most welcome.  Melinda West will give a visual presentation of examples of successful projects done with young people over her thirty years as a teaching artist.  She will also give recognition to the many Cultural Teachers over the years that have influence her approach and understanding towards the importance of native plants; Indigenous Cultural environmental knowledge; and the need for maintaining this knowledge through the practice of traditional arts and crafts.

    Melinda West, of Indianola Washington, has been practicing the art of plant-fiber weaving since 1985. She has studied with many native and non-native weavers and artists, the foremost being Ed Carriere, of the Suquamish Tribe. Her inspiration comes from nature and the First Peoples of the Pacific Northwest whose cultures embrace the rich traditions of natural fiber use; knowledge in the land; and artistic skill development in all aspects of life.  Melinda enjoys sharing her love of natural history, environmental stewardship, and an appreciation of indigenous cultures through the arts, teaching at the Seattle Art Museum, Olympic College, Coupeville Art Center, North Cascades Institute, Olympic Park Institute and IslandWood.  Melinda’s award-winning art is on display in public and private collections and her work has been featured in books and magazines. 


    • Saturday, August 26, 2017
    • Sunday, August 27, 2017
    • 2 sessions
    • 8890 Three Tree Lane, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110
    • 10

    Weaving Nature – Plant Fiber Projects Blending Culture, Science & Art 

    with 

    Melinda West   

    BARN Members: $195
    Non-Members: $254


    Pacific Northwest landscapes are home to a wealth of native and introduced plants known to have rich histories of fiber use by the Salish Peoples of this region.  Approaching life with the instincts of a child, we learn the most enduring knowledge, as humans have always learned, through use of all the senses, and by observation and engagement with the natural world.  

    Melinda draws upon her thirty plus years of experience working as a teaching artist in traditional classrooms and non-traditional field-settings outdoors, where she has designed plant fiber projects blending culture, science and art lessons for students of all ages, from pre-school to elder.  After teaching thousands of young people, and being unable to keep up with the many requests from teachers to come into their classrooms each year, Melinda is creating a “how-to-guide” for classroom teachers, parents, and for cultural and environmental educators.  

    This is a workshop for anyone who works with young people, and wishes to build their own skills at:  

    • incorporating Salish cultural plant fiber uses and perspectives; 
    • how to easily integrate science and art concepts in any project; 
    • how to break down the steps in projects to fit the particular needs of your family, classroom, or program. 
    This weekend of intensive learning is for those interested in helping Melinda workshop this publication.  Participants will leave with their own marked-up and corrected draft of the project guide, and samples of more than a dozen projects, each connecting the makers to the natural seasonal rhythm of the Pacific Northwest.

    Instructor Bio:  Melinda West, of Indianola Washington, has been practicing the art of plant-fiber weaving since 1985. She has studied with many native and non-native weavers and artists, the foremost being Ed Carriere, of the Suquamish Tribe. Her inspiration comes from nature and the First Peoples of the Pacific Northwest whose cultures embrace the rich traditions of natural fiber use; knowledge in the land; and artistic skill development in all aspects of life.  Melinda enjoys sharing her love of natural history, environmental stewardship, and an appreciation of indigenous cultures through the arts, teaching at the Seattle Art Museum, Olympic College, Coupeville Art Center, North Cascades Institute, Olympic Park Institute and IslandWood.  Melinda’s award-winning art is on display in public and private collections and her work has been featured in books and magazines. 

    Materials Fee Per Student Payable to BARN at Class: $80 per student


    • Saturday, September 09, 2017
    • Sunday, September 10, 2017
    • 2 sessions
    • 8890 Three Tree Lane, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110
    • 8

    BARN Members: $195

    Non-BARN Members: $254 

    Making papers from plant fibers was first developed in China over 2,000 years ago where it was discovered that certain plants with long, tough, vertical strands in their stems, inner bark, or leaves, contained a high percentage of cell-wall material that did not easily decompose.  This material is called cellulose, and cellulose from plant fibers is the main ingredient of paper. 

    Students will experience the process of papermaking using bits of flowers, leaves, grasses, inner bark, and other natural gifts from the backyard garden.  They will learn all the steps from building a screen and deckle, to making pulps and slurry’s, and learning to control the thickness, strength and quality of wonderfully textured art papers.  

    The instructor will provide pulps for several types of paper, and lots of natural materials to incorporate into the papers while screening them.  

    Students are encouraged to bring materials from home they would like to experiment with, such as dried flower petals, spices, bits of thread and ribbon, garden seeds, small pressed leaves, feathers, etc.  

    This class will be a playful environment where creative experimentation is encouraged.

    Instructor BioMelinda West, of Indianola Washington, has been practicing the art of plant-fiber weaving since 1985. She has studied with many native and non-native weavers and artists, the foremost being Ed Carriere, of the Suquamish Tribe. Her inspiration comes from nature and the First Peoples of the Pacific Northwest whose cultures embrace the rich traditions of natural fiber use; knowledge in the land; and artistic skill development in all aspects of life.  Melinda enjoys sharing her love of natural history, environmental stewardship, and an appreciation of indigenous cultures through the arts, teaching at the Seattle Art Museum, Olympic College, Coupeville Art Center, North Cascades Institute, Olympic Park Institute and IslandWood.  Melinda’s award-winning art is on display in public and private collections and her work has been featured in books and magazines. 

    Material Fees: $50 payable to BARN



    • Saturday, September 23, 2017
    • Sunday, September 24, 2017
    • 2 sessions
    • 8898 Three Tree Lane, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110
    • 11

    BARN Members: $195

    Non-BARN Members: $254

    All the native plant materials for use by students have all been respectfully gathered and prepared by Jo and George Hart, of Wilderness Basketry in Seabeck, Washington.  This is an intermediate class for those who have had some prior experience with twining, or weaving with cedar.  

    Using natural and dyed Western Red Cedar inner bark, Bear Grass, waxed linen, or yarn; students will learn to set-up, weave, and control the shape of a pouch basket using a mold provided by the instructor for use in class.  

    Depending on prior experience, students may design their own pattern on the sides of their baskets using a 2/2 twill; or learning techniques such as half-turn and full-turn twinning, arrow stitch with “z” and “s” twinning, 3-strand twinning, and woven and/or crossed “x’s”.  Students can learn a simple folded rim, or more complex braided rim.  

    Jo Hart is a generous teacher who will guide students through all the steps of making a beautiful cedar pouch which can be hung from the shoulder, or around the neck, for holding whatever is treasured.  Jo will provide a leather cord for everyone as well as beads for embellishment.

    Instructor BioJo Ann Hart grew up in the Appalachian Mountains near Berea, Kentucky.  When school was out, she would go out to play after breakfast and would be gone for the day exploring the flora and fauna.  There were no neighbor children to play with, so she usually entertained herself by studying nature and playing with native plants.  Her first basket was made from cockleburs and dyed with poke berries, and she often wove homes and bridges for insects from weed stems.  With the help of her Cherokee Appalachian grandmother, from an early age she learned to identify native plants and trees, and edible and medicinal plants.  Her family life brought her to the Pacific NW, where her love making baskets with native plants was rekindled.  Her first structured class was with instructor Melinda West in the mid 1980’s.  Once she started weaving, she couldn’t stop!  She has since studied with many contemporary fiber artists and pacific NW Native American Basket Weavers, apprenticing with Suquamish elder, Ed Carriere.  Jo teaches and shows her work locally and throughout the US.  Weaving gives her great pleasure, and she is happy to share her knowledge of plants and basketry, hoping others may also experience the spiritual and physical connection that working with natural materials offers.    

    Materials Fee Per Student Payable to BARN at Class: $85 

    • Saturday, September 30, 2017
    • Sunday, October 01, 2017
    • 2 sessions
    • 8890 Three Tree Lane, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110
    • 10

    BARN Members: $195

    Non-BARN Members: $254

    Jo and George Hart, of Wilderness Basketry, have had amazing success growing their own NW Sweet Grass in their large beautiful garden in Seabeck Washington.  

    George will be teaching the Coiled Basketry technique.  This style of basket involves sewing as part of the construction.  

    In this beginning to intermediate class, students will be using the Harts’ homegrown NW Sweet Grass, which grows naturally in protected Pacific NW estuaries, for the core or foundational material of the coil.  Natural and dyed raffia will be used as the wrapping and stitching material which holds the coils together, one on top of another.  

    George is a wonderful and patient teacher who enjoys passing on the traditional knowledge he has learned about the coiling technique.  He will teach students how to:

    •  start either a round or oblong start; 
    • how to shape the basket by the angle of the needle; 
    • how to add a simple design using dyed raffia;
    • how to finish the basket with a braided rim. 
    Part of the class will be a demonstration and a discussion by the instructor of:  how to coil with other materials such as cedar roots, or paper core; how to make an imbricated design with cherry bark, and horsetail root; and how to do beaded design with Bear Grass.

    Materials Fee Per Student Payable to BARN at Class:  $40 per student

    Instructor BioGeorge Hart grew up in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia.  He is a recently retired Fish and Wildlife Biologist, and has always felt connect to nature.  George devoted many years to the gathering, harvesting, and preparation of native plant materials, with his wife Jo Ann, before he developed his own interest in basket making.  When he did finally attempt his first basket, his wife couldn’t help notice that the weaving seemed to come naturally to him.  George has studied with many native and non-native fiber artists, and has also studied carving with Duane Pasco.  He has been a member of the NW Basket Weavers Guild for many years.  His preferred techniques are coiling and twining.  He likes learning about all kinds of materials, and enjoys sharing his passion for fine weaving. 

    • Saturday, October 21, 2017
    • 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
    • BARN Fiber Studio, 8890 Three Tree Lane, BI
    • 12

    Northwest Coast Basket Weaving 
    with Nancy Sigo

    BARN Members: $98

    NonMembers: $127

    The Salish Peoples of the Puget Sound Region have always been known as Weaving Cultures.  Suquamish Weaver Nancy Sigo will share her wealth of knowledge about weaving with Western Red Cedar.  Participants will engage in preparing their own cedar bark strip for weaving; learning how to split it to the desired widths. Learning the splitting technique is an important part of the teaching.  Nancy will provide her prepared materials in kits, so students will have enough of the beautifully prepared split cedar to make a 4"X 4" woven basket.  Students will learn the techniques of basic weaving, and twining using dyed raffia and will learn about, and have the opportunity to use, bear grass as a decorative weaving element.  Students will use natural or dyed materials as they are designing their basket, learning to control the shape as they progress, and finishing the edge with a beautiful folded and wrapped rim.

    Instructor:  Nancy Sigo, a member of the Suquamish Tribe, learned to gather, process, prepare and weave cedar bark; through the time honored cultural connection of using native plant fibers to weave traditional material objects for a wide variety of functional uses.  Over 26 years ago, Nancy began to learn from her relatives all aspects of how to weave with Western Red Cedar, and many other weaving materials like Bear grass, NW Sweet Grass, Rye Grass, and Nettles.  Nancy shares important knowledge from her own life experiences and her Salish weaving culture.  When, where, and how to gather; how to process and store the materials, so many lessons to learn.  Nancy feels very blessed with the gift of weaving from a long line of grandmother teachers.  She looks forward to meeting others who share a desire to learn this type of weaving and will gladly share that knowledge.

    Materials Fee payable in class: Choice of Kits $60 or $80

    $60 - Includes white raffia; choice of one colored raffia; prepared cedar strips.

    $80 - These kits will be pre-packaged and color coordinated. (cedar strip colors could be limited.) Kit includes white raffia and dyed material; cedar strips in shades of red, brown, black or green; raffia: red, brown, maroon, blue, green, or purple.







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